label

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label

 [la´b'l]
something that identifies; an identifying mark or tag.
radioactive label a radioisotope that is incorporated into a compound to mark it.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

la·bel

(lā'bĕl),
1. To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, such as a radionuclide, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.
See also: package insert.
2. The substance so incorporated.
See also: package insert.
3. Any display of written, printed, or graphic materials accompanying a pharmaceutical or a medical device at any time while such is in interstate commerce or offered for sale; often used as a synonym for package insert (q.v.).
See also: package insert.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

label

A description of a drug product or device provided by the manufacturer and approved by the regulatory authority of a particular country or jurisdiction, which includes indications for its use, who should use it, adverse events, instructions for use, and safety information.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

label

Pharmacology A display of written, printed or graphic matter upon a container or article; all information placed on the container must, in the case of medications, also be placed on the product's outside container or wrapper
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

la·bel

(lā'bĕl)
1. To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, such as a radionuclide, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.
2. The substance so incorporated.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

label

any marker, often a radioactive atom (TRACER), that makes it possible to locate and monitor a particular molecule or organism.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

la·bel

(sig) (lā'bĕl)
To incorporate into a compound a substance that is readily detected, whereby its metabolism can be followed or its physical distribution detected.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about label

Q. Provide me some examples of food labels and nutrition calculations. Hello, Can any one provide me some examples of food labels and nutrition calculations?

A. I have given some 5 basic questions and answers which are related to food labels and nutrition calculations. Hope you will find it useful:

1. How many calories would you consume if you ate the entire bag?
90 calories x 4 servings = 360 calories

2. What is the total amount of calories that come from fat in the entire bag?
30 calories from fat x 4 servings = 120 calories

3. What is the percentage of calories that come from fat in the entire bag?
120 calories from fat ÷ 360 calories = 33%

4. How many calories per serving come from carbohydrates?
13 g Carbohydrates x 4 calories = 52 calories

5. How many calories per serving come from protein?
3 g Protein x 4 calories = 12 calories

Hope you find is useful.

More discussions about label
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
During LABLE II, the OU Streamline DL also evaluated a six-beam technique, which was developed by Sathe (2012) to minimize the variance contamination caused by the DBS technique.
Since one primary focus of LABLE was the comparison of turbulence parameters from different instruments, lidar quality control techniques were designed to optimize the accuracy of turbulence estimates.
In the following, some initial results from the LABLE campaign are highlighted and discussed.
For these comparisons, data were used for each full day of LABLE I in which there was at least 50% data availability from the sonic anemometer at 60 m.
In LABLE I, we applied the AERIoe retrieval to the operational AERI system, which is collecting spectral data at 30-s resolution.
During the LABLE I campaign period, LLJs with peak winds of at least 10 m [s.sup.-1] were observed on 20 nights.
For a more detailed analysis of the LLJ evolution throughout the night, we determined the height of the LLJ nose [Z.sub.LLJ] and the wind speed [V.sub.LLJ] at the height of the jet nose for all nocturnal (0000-1200 UTC) wind profiles for which a wind speed maximum was detected within the height range of the OU Streamline DL during LABLE I (599 profiles in total).
An important objective of LABLE was the investigation of the turbulence regimes associated with LLJs.
During LABLE II we used a tri-Doppler technique that provides all three velocity components at 1-s temporal resolution.