agonist

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agonist

 [ag´o-nist]
in pharmacology, a drug that has affinity for the cellular receptors of another drug or natural substance and that produces a physiological effect.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ag·o·nist

(ag'on-ist),
1. Denoting a muscle in a state of contraction, with reference to its opposing muscle, or antagonist.
2. A drug capable of combining with receptors to initiate drug actions; it possesses affinity and intrinsic activity.
[G. agōn, a contest]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

agonist

(ăg′ə-nĭst)
n.
1. Physiology A contracting muscle that is resisted or counteracted by another muscle, the antagonist.
2. A substance that can combine with a receptor on a cell to initiate signal transduction.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Agonist

Anatomy Agonist muscle, prime mover. A muscle that causes a particular movement to occur, creating a normal range of movement in a joint by contracting; a muscle which moves in one general direction.
Molecular biology A ligand which binds a receptor at a site adjacent to the active site.
Pharmacology Agonist medication. A chemical entity that does not naturally occur in the body and acts on one or more receptors (e.g., mu, delta, and kappa opiate receptors) by structural mimicry of the receptors’ natural ligand(s). It may be an agonist or partial agonist for a particular receptor, promoting a receptor-mediated biological response, often by competing with another substance (usually the natural or native substance) at the same receptor. A partial agonist produces less than the maximum effect even if given in a concentration sufficient to bind with all available receptors.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

agonist

Pharmacology A substance that promotes a receptor-mediated biologic response, often by competing with another substance at the same receptor. Cf Antagonist.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ag·o·nist

(ag'ŏn-ist)
1. A muscle (or group of muscles) whose contraction produces a specific action with reference to its antagonist muscle (or muscles).
2. A drug capable of combining with receptors to initiate drug actions; it possesses affinity and intrinsic activity.
[G. agōn, a contest]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

agonist

1. A molecule, such as a HORMONE, NEUROTRANSMITTER or drug, that attaches (binds) to a cell receptor site to produce an effect on the cell. Many drugs are agonists having an effect similar or identical to natural body agonists. Other drugs act on the receptor in a blocking role and are antagonists. An antagonist is a molecule that interferes with or prevents the action of the agonist.
2. A contracting muscle that is opposed by contraction of another associated muscle, the antagonist.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

agonist

  1. a substance capable of binding to a molecular target on the cell surface (RECEPTOR) to elicit a biological response. Examples include HORMONES and DRUGS.
  2. a muscle which initiates a response or change in position of a body part acting against an ANTAGONISTIC MUSCLE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Agonist

A medication that has an affinity for and stimulates the activity of cell receptors that are normally stimulated by naturally occurring substances, including melatonin.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

agonist 

1. An agonistic muscle.
2. A substance (e.g. a drug, hormone or neurotransmitter) that binds with a cell receptor to initiate a physiological response similar to that produced by the natural neurotransmitter or hormone. Example: pilocarpine, which mimics the effect of acetylcholine acting on cholinergic receptors. See antagonist.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

ag·o·nist

(ag'ŏn-ist)
1. Denoting a muscle in a state of contraction, with reference to its opposing muscle, or antagonist.
2. A drug capable of combining with receptors to initiate drug actions; it possesses affinity and intrinsic activity.
[G. agōn, a contest]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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We cautioned physicians to closely monitor new users of LABAs and LAMAs for cardiovascular symptoms.
And Laba hoped that he can leave a lasting imprint like Ghana international Asamoah Gyan did at the club.
Strikingly post-medication reversibility test results mean values of FVC, [FEV.sub.1], [FEV.sub.1]/FVC, and PEFR were significantly much less among combined drug users than that of lone LABA using patients.
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In the present study, 3% of the athletes reported daily use of fixed-combination ICS + LABA. Among those with self-reported asthma, daily use of ICS + LABA was at 23%, slightly higher than the general population's rate of 19% [19].
Laba is one of 131 veterans to be honored on Saturday -- Flag Day -- in Washington.
In November 2002, Theravance entered into a long-acting beta2 agonist (LABA) collaboration with GSK to develop and commercialize a once-daily LABA product candidate either as a single agent or in a combination medicine for the treatment of asthma and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
The second trial compared adding either an LTRA or a long-acting inhaled beta2 agonist (LABA).
Hasroun Municipality Head, Laba Awwad, assured that Hasroun citizens are always supporting Patriarch Sfeir's stances especially during the unstable situation in Lebanon.
Mike Ward of Ambrian Partners said the approval bar for new drugs containing a long-acting beta-agonist (LABA), like Advair, had also effectively been raised by a recent furor over LABA safety.
The instructors are Dennis Laba, director of technical marketing for personal care ingredients at Presperse, Inc., and Philip Miner, a senior research biophysicist at Unilever HPC North America's Skin Global Innovation Center in Trumbull, CT.