LVH


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LVH

Left ventricular hypertrophy, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hypertrophy

(hi-per'tro-fe) [ hyper- + -trophy]
1. An increase in the size of an organ, structure, or the body due to growth rather than tumor formation. This term is generally restricted to an increase in size or bulk that results not from an increase in the number of cells but from an increase in a cellular component, e.g., proteins. It applies to any increase in size as a result of functional activity. Synonym: hypertrophia See: hyperplasiahypertrophic (hi?per-tro'fik), adjective
2. To cause or experience hypertrophy.

adaptive hypertrophy

Hypertrophy in which an organ increases in size to meet increased functional demands, as of the heart in valvular disorders.

adenoid hypertrophy

Hypertrophy of the pharyngeal tonsil. It occurs commonly in children and may be congenital or result from infection of Waldeyer ring.

benign prostatic hypertrophy

Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

cardiac hypertrophy

A regional or generalized hypertrophy in myocardial mass. It may be caused by exercise, chronic hypertension, genetic illnesses, or valvular dysfunction. Synonym: hypertrophy of the heart

compensatory hypertrophy

Hypertrophy due to increased function of an organ because of a defect or impaired function of the opposite of a paired organ.

concentric hypertrophy

Hypertrophy in which the walls of an organ become thickened without enlargement but with diminished capacity.

congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium

See: congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium

eccentric hypertrophy

Hypertrophy of an organ with dilatation.

false hypertrophy

Hypertrophy with degeneration of one constituent of an organ and its replacement by another.

gingival hypertrophy

Hypertrophy of the gums, sometimes associated with prolonged treatment with medications such as cyclosporine, nifedipine, or phenytoin. Thorough professional cleaning of the teeth, electrosurgical, laser, or conventional surgical treatments can remove the excess tissue.

hypertrophy of the heart

Cardiac hypertrophy.

left ventricular hypertrophy

Abbreviation: LVH
Hypertrophy of the left ventricle of the heart to greater than 100 g/m2 in women or 131 g/m2 in men. Hypertrophy of the left ventricle is associated with an increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, stroke, and other causes. The size of the left ventricle can be reduced through regular exercise, weight loss, and by drugs that control high blood pressure. LVH can be detected nonivasively by its appearance on the 12-lead electrocardiogram or by echocardiography.

Marie hypertrophy

See: Marie, Pierre Marie

numerical hypertrophy

Hypertrophy caused by an increase in structural elements.

physiological hypertrophy

Hypertrophy due to natural rather than pathological factors.

pseudomuscular hypertrophy

A disease, usually of childhood, characterized by paralysis, depending on degeneration of the muscles, which paradoxically become enlarged from a deposition of fat and connective tissue.

Symptoms

The disease causes muscle weakness. The patient is awkward and often seeks support while walking to prevent falls. As the disease progresses, the muscles, particularly those of the calf, thigh, buttocks, and back, enlarge. The upper extremities are less frequently affected. When the patient stands erect, the feet are wide apart, the abdomen protrudes, and the spinal column shows a marked curvature with convexity forward. Rising from the recumbent position is accomplished by grasping the knees or by resting the hands on the floor in front, extending the legs and pushing the body backward. The gait is characterized by waddling. In a few years the paralysis becomes so marked that the patient is unable to leave the bed, which leads to further generalized muscular atrophy.

Treatment

Physical therapy helps to prevent contractures, but there is no effective therapy. The prognosis for this disease is unfavorable.

simple hypertrophy

Hypertrophy due to an increase in the size of structural parts.

true hypertrophy

Hypertrophy caused by an increase in the size of all the different tissues composing a part.

ventricular hypertrophy

Left or right ventricular hypertrophy.

vicarious hypertrophy

Hypertrophy of an organ when another organ of allied function is disabled or destroyed.

left ventricular hypertrophy

Abbreviation: LVH
Hypertrophy of the left ventricle of the heart to greater than 100 g/m2 in women or 131 g/m2 in men. Hypertrophy of the left ventricle is associated with an increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, stroke, and other causes. The size of the left ventricle can be reduced through regular exercise, weight loss, and by drugs that control high blood pressure. LVH can be detected nonivasively by its appearance on the 12-lead electrocardiogram or by echocardiography.
See also: hypertrophy
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The data from this research indicate that resting circulating levels of IGF-I were higher in athletes with physiological left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) compared to athletes with normal heart dimension and sedentary subjects.
Unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) for serum cardiac troponin concentrations above the 99th percentile upper reference limit were obtained by logistic regression on the following single clinical variables: sex, age, eGFR, body mass index (BMI), mean arterial pressure, hemoglobin, LVH, diabetes, known preexisting cardiovascular or arteriopathic disease, cholesterol, PTH, and calcium x phosphate product.
It was observed that 44 out of 150 patients had LVH [29.3%].
Echocardiographic examination was performed before testing: there were no typical signs of AFD, and she had moderate LVH with hyperechogenic/hypokinetic LV walls and reduced ejection fraction of left ventricle 30% according to two-dimensional transthoracic.
Unfortunately, a very low percentage (23.1%) of doctors in the present study correctly identified the CPG (2008) recommended ARB as preferred antihypertensive therapy for patients with LVH. If we assume that the possible reason for this poor performance could be the nature of the disease, LVH, an advanced and complicated form of cardiovascular disease (CVD), supposed to be treated by cardiologists, still would not justify the doctors' poor performance, because, firstly, all the doctors are supposed to be familiar with guidelines recommendation for treating LVH and secondly half of our respondents (n = 13) were practicing in cardiology clinic.
LVH is the thickening of the muscle wall in the heart's left pumping chamber and is a serious risk factor for future heart attack, stroke and heart failure.
Also, former players who reported symptoms of sleep apnea were more likely to have hypertension and LVH, the news release said.
Target organ damage assessed for included LVH as determined by echocardiography undertaken by a paediatric cardiologist, nephropathy based on presence or absence of proteinuria on urine dipstick analysis, retinopathy and cerebrovascular accidents.
It is known that pulse pressure affects the occurrence of LVH but little is known of the type of LVH that is most affected.
LVH is diagnosed by either of the three diagnostic tools; electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which is the gold standard.
PATIENT'S CLAIM: The Gyn fell below the standard of care during the LVH when he negligently cauterized and/ or burned the patient's ureters.
In the literature, the most common cardiac rhythm anomalies are atrial fibrillation (AF), QTc prolongation, T inversion, ST depression, and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) findings (14,15,16).