LVH


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LVH

Left ventricular hypertrophy, see there.

hypertrophy

(hi-per'tro-fe) [ hyper- + -trophy]
1. An increase in the size of an organ, structure, or the body due to growth rather than tumor formation. This term is generally restricted to an increase in size or bulk that results not from an increase in the number of cells but from an increase in a cellular component, e.g., proteins. It applies to any increase in size as a result of functional activity. Synonym: hypertrophia See: hyperplasiahypertrophic (hi?per-tro'fik), adjective
2. To cause or experience hypertrophy.

adaptive hypertrophy

Hypertrophy in which an organ increases in size to meet increased functional demands, as of the heart in valvular disorders.

adenoid hypertrophy

Hypertrophy of the pharyngeal tonsil. It occurs commonly in children and may be congenital or result from infection of Waldeyer ring.

benign prostatic hypertrophy

Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

cardiac hypertrophy

A regional or generalized hypertrophy in myocardial mass. It may be caused by exercise, chronic hypertension, genetic illnesses, or valvular dysfunction. Synonym: hypertrophy of the heart

compensatory hypertrophy

Hypertrophy due to increased function of an organ because of a defect or impaired function of the opposite of a paired organ.

concentric hypertrophy

Hypertrophy in which the walls of an organ become thickened without enlargement but with diminished capacity.

congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium

See: congenital hypertrophy of the retinal pigment epithelium

eccentric hypertrophy

Hypertrophy of an organ with dilatation.

false hypertrophy

Hypertrophy with degeneration of one constituent of an organ and its replacement by another.

gingival hypertrophy

Hypertrophy of the gums, sometimes associated with prolonged treatment with medications such as cyclosporine, nifedipine, or phenytoin. Thorough professional cleaning of the teeth, electrosurgical, laser, or conventional surgical treatments can remove the excess tissue.

hypertrophy of the heart

Cardiac hypertrophy.

left ventricular hypertrophy

Abbreviation: LVH
Hypertrophy of the left ventricle of the heart to greater than 100 g/m2 in women or 131 g/m2 in men. Hypertrophy of the left ventricle is associated with an increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, stroke, and other causes. The size of the left ventricle can be reduced through regular exercise, weight loss, and by drugs that control high blood pressure. LVH can be detected nonivasively by its appearance on the 12-lead electrocardiogram or by echocardiography.

Marie hypertrophy

See: Marie, Pierre Marie

numerical hypertrophy

Hypertrophy caused by an increase in structural elements.

physiological hypertrophy

Hypertrophy due to natural rather than pathological factors.

pseudomuscular hypertrophy

A disease, usually of childhood, characterized by paralysis, depending on degeneration of the muscles, which paradoxically become enlarged from a deposition of fat and connective tissue.

Symptoms

The disease causes muscle weakness. The patient is awkward and often seeks support while walking to prevent falls. As the disease progresses, the muscles, particularly those of the calf, thigh, buttocks, and back, enlarge. The upper extremities are less frequently affected. When the patient stands erect, the feet are wide apart, the abdomen protrudes, and the spinal column shows a marked curvature with convexity forward. Rising from the recumbent position is accomplished by grasping the knees or by resting the hands on the floor in front, extending the legs and pushing the body backward. The gait is characterized by waddling. In a few years the paralysis becomes so marked that the patient is unable to leave the bed, which leads to further generalized muscular atrophy.

Treatment

Physical therapy helps to prevent contractures, but there is no effective therapy. The prognosis for this disease is unfavorable.

simple hypertrophy

Hypertrophy due to an increase in the size of structural parts.

true hypertrophy

Hypertrophy caused by an increase in the size of all the different tissues composing a part.

ventricular hypertrophy

Left or right ventricular hypertrophy.

vicarious hypertrophy

Hypertrophy of an organ when another organ of allied function is disabled or destroyed.

left ventricular hypertrophy

Abbreviation: LVH
Hypertrophy of the left ventricle of the heart to greater than 100 g/m2 in women or 131 g/m2 in men. Hypertrophy of the left ventricle is associated with an increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease, stroke, and other causes. The size of the left ventricle can be reduced through regular exercise, weight loss, and by drugs that control high blood pressure. LVH can be detected nonivasively by its appearance on the 12-lead electrocardiogram or by echocardiography.
See also: hypertrophy

LVH

left ventricular hypertrophy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In conclusion, our study revealed that in Chinese patients with CKD, the percentage of hyperphosphatemia is comparable to reports from other countries, and levels of phosphorus are independently associated with cardiovascular markers including AAC and LVH.
Longitudinal observations confirming the association between the genetic marker of oxidative stress (Q192R) and the evolution of LVH and LV systolic dysfunction over time add strength to the hypothesis that these links might underlie a causal effect.
Levels of systolic and diastolic blood pressure--assessed by both blood pressure index and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring--were not associated with the presence of LVH in African American or non-African American children.
An imaging test, such as an echocardiogram, is the best way to diagnose LVH.
In line with the involvement of paracrine and endocrine factors in LVH stimulation are data obtained in patients with hypertension (Diez, 1999), and coronary heart diseases (Fischer et al.
But there was no indication that LVH raised the risk of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, the researchers report in the American Journal of Cardiology (6/15).
Among the individuals who developed HF, rates of LVEF below 50% and LVH were 15% and 32%, respectively.
The survival rate of the 62 recipients of transplanted hearts with LVH was comparable with that of 365 people who got hearts without LVH, said study senior author Dr.
Peter Okin, MD, a cardiologist at Weill Cornell Medical College, says that LVH also needs to be controlled to reduce diabetes risk.
Presentations to date have been accepted from Airbus, ANAC, Arkema, Indestructible Paint, LVH, and Nadcap.