carnitine

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Related to L-carnitine: taurine, acetyl l-carnitine, L-arginine

carnitine

 [kahr´nĭ-tēn]
a derivative of betaine found in skeletal muscle and liver; it is necessary for the mitochondrial oxidation of fatty acids.

car·ni·tine

(kar'ni-tēn),
A trimethylammonium (betaine) derivative of γ-amino-β-hydroxybutyrate, formed from Nε,Nε,Nε-trimethyllysine and from γ-butyrobetaine; the l-isomer is a thyroid inhibitor found in muscle, liver, and meat extract; l-carnitine is an acyl carrier with respect to the mitochondrial membrane and thus stimulates fatty acid oxidation.
Synonym(s): BT factor, vitamin BT
[L. caro carn-, flesh + ine]

carnitine

/car·ni·tine/ (kahr´nĭ-tēn) a betaine derivative involved in the transport of fatty acids into mitochondria, where they are metabolized.

carnitine

(kär′nĭ-tēn′)
n.
A compound that functions in fatty acid metabolism by transporting fatty acids into mitochondria for energy production. It is naturally produced in the body and is present in many animal products, especially red meat. It is also sold as a dietary supplement for its purported health benefits.

carnitine

[kär′nitin]
a substance found in skeletal and cardiac muscle and certain other tissues that functions as a carrier of fatty acids across the membranes of the mitochondria. It is used therapeutically in treating angina and certain deficiency diseases, particularly endocardial fibroelastosis, and as an antithyroid agent. It has actions that closely resemble those of amino acids and B vitamins.

carnitine

Chemistry
An essential amino acid that transports long-chain fatty acids across the inner mitochondrial membrane for breakdown to CO2 or ketone bodies; it acts as an acyl (fatty acid carrier). Carnitine is endogenous (synthesised in the liver and kidneys from lysine and methionine) or exogenous (from red meat and dairy products).

Fringe nutrition
Carnitine allegedly enhances athletic performance, prevents heart disease, controls weight and has anti-ageing properties; current data does not support these assertions.

car·ni·tine

(kahr'ni-tēn)
A trimethylammonium (betaine) derivative of gamma-amino-beta-hydroxybutyric acid, formed from NE,NE,NE -trimethyllsine and from gamma-butyrobetaine; the l-isomer is a thyroid inhibitor found in muscle, liver, and meat extracts; l-carnitine is an acyl carrier with respect to the mitochondrial membrane; it thus stimulates fatty acid oxidation.
[G. karnin, an alkali derived from meat]

carnitine (kärˑ·n·tēn),

n an amino acid found in meat, dairy sources, avocados, tempeh, and wheat. Claimed to be helpful in endurance and congestive heart failure. Often used by body builders.

car·ni·tine

(kahr'ni-tēn)
Compound found in dairy and meat that stimulates fatty acid oxidation.
[G. karnin, an alkali derived from meat]

carnitine (kar´nətēn´),

n a compound found naturally in red meat and dairy, as well as in legumes and nuts, this quaternary ammonium compound assists in the movement of fatty acids through the membrane of the mitochondria.

carnitine

coenzyme of fatty acid oxidation and acetyl transfer; often designated vitamin BT, due to its vitamin role in Tenebrio sp. Present in high concentrations (5% dry weight) in meat extracts.

carnitine acetyltransferase
enzyme associated with buffering of acetyl groups from acetyl CoA.
carnitine deficiency
associated with myocardial disease in dogs, particularly Boxers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusions: Acute L-carnitine supplementation possibly affects exercise performance and triglycerides in athletes rather than sedentarymen.
10 L-carnitine is concentrated in high energy-demanding tissues such as skeletal and cardiac muscles, and in a specialised reproductive tract organ, the epididymis.
Effects of L-carnitine supplementation on muscular symptoms in hemodialyzed patients.
The L-carnitine content of breast and thigh meat from KICs is presented in Table 3.
In both retrospective and prospective studies, researchers have observed that plasma levels of TMAO, choline, lecithin, betaine, and L-carnitine are associated with coronary artery disease (CAD), cerebrovascular events and peripheral artery disease.
Although there are two forms of carnitine--L-carnitine and D-carnitine--differentiated by their spatial structure, in the human body only L-Carnitine is synthesized.
Stock standard solution of L-carnitine was prepared in water at a concentration of 67.
Free l-carnitine is a high polarized and water-soluble substance being first isolated from bovine muscle in 1905, and its chemical structure was identified in 1948.
1) Based on the results of this meta-analysis, the authors suggest L-carnitine as a potential future therapy for heart attack and secondary coronary prevention and treatment, including angina.
Effect of L-carnitine on motility and acrosome reaction of human spermatozoa.
Gut bacteria digest the nutrient, L-carnitine, and help turn it into an artery-hardening chemical- particularly in meat eaters, researchers report April 7 in Nature Medicine.
Independent of the well-known ability of saturated fat to elevate blood cholesterol, the team found that L-carnitine promotes atherosclerosis by getting digested in the human gut by bacteria that turn L-carnitine into another compound, TMAO, that has been shown to cause atherosclerosis in mice.