Krukenberg tumor


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Kru·ken·berg tu·mor

(krū'kĕn-berg),
a metastatic carcinoma of the ovary, usually bilateral and secondary to a mucous carcinoma of the stomach, which contains signet-ring cells filled with mucus.

Kru·ken·berg tu·mor

(krū'kĕn-berg tū'mŏr)
A metastatic carcinoma of the ovary, usually bilateral and secondary to a mucous carcinoma of the stomach, which contains signet-ring cells filled with mucus.

Krukenberg tumor

A malignant metastasis to the ovary, usually bilateral and frequently secondary to malignancy of the gastrointestinal tract. Histologically, these tumors consist of myxomatous connective tissue and cells having a signet ring arrangement of their nuclei. The epithelial tissue resembles the malignancy of the original site.

Krukenberg,

Friedrich, German pathologist, 1871-1946.
Krukenberg amputation - a cineplastic amputation at the carpus with the distal end of the forearm.
Krukenberg pigment spindle forceps
Krukenberg spindle - a vertical fusiform area of melanin pigmentation on the posterior surface of the central cornea.
Krukenberg sponge
Krukenberg tumor - metastatic carcinoma of the ovary.
References in periodicals archive ?
Krukenberg tumor with a predominant tubular pattern and associated stromal hyperplasia may mimic sertoliform endometrioid adenocarcinoma or Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor on frozen sections (A).
Ovarian metastatic tumors that contain a component of signet-ring cells are known as Krukenberg tumors (KTs) and originate mainly from the stomach (76%), intestines (11%), breast (4%), and other organs [1].
Noh, "Survival benefit of metastasectomy for Krukenberg tumors from gastric cancer," Gynecologic Oncology, vol.
Simple awareness of this phenomenon should aid in its distinction from a Krukenberg tumor, and the more variegated architecture of Krukenberg tumors is not a feature of the signet- ring stromal tumor.
Appendiceal mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas, a rare entity that can present as a Krukenberg tumor: Case report and review of the literature.
5, 6) and 2 cases of Krukenberg tumors of ovary 2/34 (5.88%).
Krukenberg tumors are more likely to be bilateral or multinodular or to exhibit extraovarian extension.
Krukenberg tumor is typically free of surface adhesions or peritoneal deposits unlike other ovarian metastasis.
Also, ovarian metastases, including Krukenberg tumors, may be mistaken as a solid sex-cord stromal tumor and can appear as solid or complex ovarian masses (Figure 7).
It must be borne in mind, however, that unilateral ovarian involvement of Krukenberg tumors occurs in as many as 37% of cases, although in many instances both ovaries are not removed or rigorously examined microscopically.
Drop metastases to the ovaries are known as Krukenberg tumors. Multidetector CT can detect this spread of disease and allow for appropriate planning and treatment decisions.
These tumors usually metastasize to regional lymph nodes (50%-80% of patients have regional lymph node metastasis at the time of surgery).[1] Metastasis by direct extension to the liver, stomach, and duodenum, as well as blood-borne metastasis (usually to the liver and lung), can occur.[1] Ovarian metastasis can give rise to Krukenberg tumors and may simulate primary ovarian neoplasms.[2] In addition, cutaneous involvement of a gallbladder primary adenocarcinoma has been reported.[3]