Korotkoff sounds


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Related to Korotkoff sounds: auscultatory gap

Ko·rot·koff sounds

(kŏ-rot'kof),
characteristic noise heard over an artery when pressure over it is reduced below systolic arterial pressure, as when blood pressure is determined by the auscultatory method.

Ko·rot·koff sounds

(kō-rot'kof sowndz)
Aural findings heard during blood pressure determination using a stethoscope and sphygmomanometer. Sounds originating within the blood passing through the vessel or produced by a vibrating motion of the arterial wall.

Korotkoff sounds

The sounds heard through a stethoscope held over a compressed artery with each pulse beat as the compression is gradually released, in the process of measuring the blood pressure with a SPHYGMOMANOMETER. The first pulse sound heard as blood is able to pass through the narrowed artery is Korotkoff phase I. The sounds get louder as the cuff pressure continues to fall, but then there is a sudden muffling. This is Korotkoff phase IV; the cuff pressure at this point has, in the past, been taken as the diastolic pressure. Soon after that the sounds disappear altogether. This is Korotkoff phase V, the cuff pressure at which is now generally taken as the diastolic. (Nikolai Sergeivich Korotkov, 1874–1920, Russian physician).

Korotkoff,

Nikolai S., Russian physician, 1874-1920.
Korotkoff sounds - sounds heard over an artery when pressure over it is reduced below systolic arterial pressure, as when blood pressure is determined by the auscultatory method.
Korotkoff test - a test of collateral circulation.

Ko·rot·koff sounds

(kō-rot'kof sowndz)
Characteristic noise heard over an artery when pressure over it is reduced below systolic arterial pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Auscultation of Korotkoff sounds over the radial artery or using a Doppler also can be done.
Graphic recording of the Korotkoff sounds. Am Heart J 1959; 57:361-370.
Oscillometric BP measurements eliminate many of the potential problems of auscultation, including deflation of the cuff too quickly, inability to hear soft Korotkoff sounds, rounding of numbers, and observer bias (National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group, 2004).
Blood pressure was auscultated with manual sphygmomanometers using the first Korotkoff sound as the systolic reading and the fifth Korotkoff sound as the diastolic reading.
Subjects for whom we were unable to obtain a blood pressure measurement were eliminated from the study; the most common reasons for inability to obtain measurements were too large of arm for the standard cuff, digital error messages, and inability to hear Korotkoff sounds. Due to these eliminations, analyses were conducted on a final sample of 83 subjects (mean age = 36.52, SD = 21.73, range 19 to 92; one subject did not report age.
Korotkoff sounds I and V were used to define SBP and diastolic BP (DBP) respectively.
Phase 5 of Korotkoff sounds (disappearance of sound) was designated as the diastolic blood pressure.
The criteria for entry into the study was a sitting systolic blood pressure range of 150 to 159 mmHg and a diastolic blood pressure (disappearance of sounds phase V, Korotkoff sounds) in range of 100 to 109 mmHg on two occasions at least 4 hours apart.
The first and fifth Korotkoff sounds were used to identify systolic and diastolic pressures.
The first and fifth Korotkoff sounds indicated systolic and diastolic pressures, respectively.
The first and the fifth phase of Korotkoff sounds were recorded as systolic and diastolic pressure, respectively.