Korotkoff's sounds

Korotkoff's sounds

sounds heard during auscultatory determination of blood pressure in humans, thought to be produced by vibratory motion of the arterial wall as the artery suddenly distends when compressed by a pneumatic blood pressure cuff. Origin of the sound may be within the blood passing through the vessel or within the wall itself.
References in periodicals archive ?
Systolic blood pressure was determined at the point at which the Korotkoff's sounds become audible (first phase) whereas the diastolic BP was measured at the point at which the sounds suddenly become faint (fourth phase of Korotkoff's sounds).
Too much pressure applied with the stethoscope may affect the quality of Korotkoff's sounds (Hockenberry et al.
Diastolic blood pressure was recorded at the disappearance of Korotkoff's sounds.