parasitoid

(redirected from Koinobiont)
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par·a·si·toid

(par'ă-sī'toyd),
Denoting a feeding relationship intermediate between predation and parasitism, in which the parasitoid eventually destroys its host; refers especially to parasitic wasps (order Hymenoptera) the larvae of which feed on and finally destroy a grub or other arthropod host stung by the mother wasp before laying its egg(s) on the host.
[parasite + G. eidos, appearance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

parasitoid

(păr′ə-sĭ-toid′, -sī′toid)
n.
An organism, usually an insect, that lives on or in a host organism during some period of its development and eventually kills its host.

par′a·sit·oid′ adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

parasitoid

any of the alternately parasitic and free-living wasps and flies, such as the ichneumon fly, whose larvae parasitize and often kill members of the host species.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of female size on host selection by a koinobiont insect parasitoid (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae).
However, given their koinobiont strategy, the wasps may be unable both to accelerate their growth and development sufficiently to exploit the earliest part of the moths' period of vulnerability more heavily and simultaneously obtain maximum resources from them (see Strand and Casas, 2008).
When parasitoids were found on larvae, they were further categorized as idiobiont (suspending leafminer development) ectoparasitoid, idiobiont endoparasitoid, or koinobiont endoparasitoid (allowing continued development of the leafminer host before eventual host death).
Aphelinidae is one of the many groups of wasps that are koinobiont endoparasitoids, in which the host nearly always dies during parasitoid development.
The Microgastrinae were the most abundant in the two environments, however, presenting the largest number of genera in the agrosilvopastoral system; this subfamily is cosmopolitan, highly diversified, comprising koinobiont endoparasitoids, solitary or gregarious on larvae of Lepidoptera (Mason, 1981; Whitfield et al., 2009).
Furthermore, individuals removed from the population at an early stage by predators or idiobiont parasitoids (that kill or permanently paralyze the host during oviposition) are unavailable to natural enemies at later stages, whereas diseased immatures and those parasitized by koinobiont parasitoids (that permit continued host development following oviposition) may remain in the population for some time and be eaten by predators or killed by some non-enemy factor.
Koinobiont parasitoid species parasitize young or early-stage hosts in which they can proceed through their development, and they usually do not kill the host until the parasitoid reaches its final developmental stage (Kant et al.
Metopiinae are solitary larval/pupal koinobiont endoparasitoids of Lepidoptera, and hosts are either caterpillars that feed exposed on plants or those that feed in weak concealment (Gauld et al., 2002).
Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Ashmead) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), which originated in the Indo-Australian region, is a koinobiont endoparasitoid of various tephritid species.
Most of the known species of Meteorus are koinobiont endoparasitoids and generally attack young caterpillars, and some are specialised in parasitising beetle larvae (Shaw and Huddleston, 1991; Shaw, 1995, 1997; Zitani and Shaw, 2002).