Koebner phenomenon


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Koebner phenomenon

[kōb′nər]
Etymology: Heinrich Koebner, Polish dermatologist, 1838-1904; Gk, phainomenon, something observed
the development of isomorphic lesions at the site of an injury, occurring in psoriasis, lichen nitidus, lichen planus, and verruca plana.
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Koebner phenomenon

Koeb·ner phe·nom·e·non

(keb'nĕr fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
Heightened susceptibility to the effects of trauma and chemical exposure in those with psoriasis, lichen planus, and other chronic dermatoses.

Koebner phenomenon

(kĕb′nēr)
[Heinrich Koebner, Ger. dermatologist, 1838–1904]
The appearance of a skin lesion as a result of nonspecific trauma (e.g., sunlight, burn, operative wound). It will appear at the trauma site and may be of a type found elsewhere on the skin. It may be seen in lichen planus or eczema but is particularly characteristic of psoriasis. The lesion must be sufficient to act on the papillary and epidermal layers of the skin and will appear in 3 to 18 days following the trauma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients with PV (VIDA score over 2 points) showed emergence of new skin lesions expansion of the original skin lesions or occurrence of the Koebner phenomenon within three months.
Introduction: Koebner phenomenon (KP) affects up to a third of patients with psoriasis and can occur on tattoos.
Koebner phenomenon was seen in 68% of the patients indicating an active disease in them.
It may arise de novo or as a part of Koebner phenomenon with other psoriatic lesions.
It comes a little bit from the Koebner phenomenon, which is when psoriasis patients develop a new lesion in the skin where an injury has been.
Sunlight with summer exacerbation was provocative factor in four patients Koebner phenomenon was seen in three patients.
This is distinctly different from an isomorphic response, also known as the Koebner phenomenon, which describes the development of the same disease at a site of damaged or traumatized skin.
Trauma--a psoriatic lesion can occur at site of trauma referred to as Koebner phenomenon.
13) Of note to the sports injury practitioner, psoriatic lesions have been known to arise at areas of trauma, which is also known as the Koebner phenomenon.
Molluscoid skin lesions in histoid leprosy with pseudo-isomorphic koebner phenomenon.