Koch's postulates

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Koch's postulates

A series of 4 conditions that must be met to establish an infectious agent as the cause of a particular disease or condition. See Molecular Koch's postulates.
Koch's postulates
1. The agent must be present in all cases of the disease
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2. The agent must be isolated from someone with the disease and grown in pure culture
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3. Inoculation into a susceptible organism of the agent–from a pure culture—must produce the disease
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4. The agent must be recovered from the infected–inoculated organism and grown again in culture  
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McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Koch's postulates

A set of criteria to be obeyed before it is established that a particular organism causes a particular disease. The organism must be present in every case and must be isolated, cultured and identified; it must produce the disease when a pure culture is given to susceptible animals; and it must be recoverable from the diseased animal. (Robert Koch, 1843–1910, German bacteriologist)
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Koch postulates have not been fulfilled for HboV, it appears likely to cause a substantial number of respiratory tract infections, at least in children (2,3).
frequently induce persistent intravascular infections, particularly in reservoir hosts, attributing disease causation to Bartonella infection in animals or in human patients has been difficult, and satisfying Koch postulates for disease causation remains challenging (21).
First, within the granulomatous brain lesions, the strongest evidence for the authors' conclusion, no acid-fast bacilli were isolated or identified on special stains; thus, the Koch postulates were not satisfied.
Generally, drawing cause-disease conclusion based on PCR sequencing needs vigilance to satisfy the modified Koch postulates (5).