Koch's postulates


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Koch's postulates

A series of 4 conditions that must be met to establish an infectious agent as the cause of a particular disease or condition. See Molecular Koch's postulates.
Koch's postulates
1. The agent must be present in all cases of the disease
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2. The agent must be isolated from someone with the disease and grown in pure culture
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3. Inoculation into a susceptible organism of the agent–from a pure culture—must produce the disease
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4. The agent must be recovered from the infected–inoculated organism and grown again in culture  
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Koch's postulates

A set of criteria to be obeyed before it is established that a particular organism causes a particular disease. The organism must be present in every case and must be isolated, cultured and identified; it must produce the disease when a pure culture is given to susceptible animals; and it must be recoverable from the diseased animal. (Robert Koch, 1843–1910, German bacteriologist)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study, Koch's postulates were tested in Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) with 8 strains of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bacillales: Bacillaceae) (GP780, GP139, GP209, GP528, GP782, GP300, GP777, and GP402) at a previously determined concentration of 10 ng/[micro]l (Torres-Quintero 2013).
So to my mind, neonicotinoid insecticides do not meet Koch's postulates as causal factors for CCD.
Koch's postulates in relation to the work of Jacob Henle and Edwin Klebs.
To satisfy Koch's postulates without an animal model for STARI, further refinement of the PCR test for B.
This point is important to understanding epidemiologic studies suggesting disease associations and highlights the timelessness of considering all of Koch's postulates and Hill's criteria of disease causality.
The second section is on the work done on the tuberculosis pathogen and the beginnings of what would become Koch's Postulates. Following this is a discussion of the transfer of information from the laboratory to the hospital.
"We don't yet have Koch's postulates fulfilled for this idea that C.
In a perfect world, Cox-Foster would have performed the classic experiments based on Koch's postulates: giving a suspected pathogen to an organism, seeing if the disease symptoms match and then trying to recover the same pathogen from the newly ill.
They noted that with the modern methods that now detect probable pathogens, it is often not possible to adhere to Koch's postulates. There often isn't a proper culture for the agent, or a suitable experimental animal model to test whether one can make the animal sick and transmit the pathogen, they said.
No preparation purported to contain HIV has been shown to satisfy Koch's Postulates.