Knowles pin

Knowles pin

Orthopedics Orthopedic hardware once commonly used for intertrochanteric fractures
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Knowles,

Frederick, U.S. orthopedic surgeon, 1888-1973.
Knowles pin - femoral neck fracture fixation device.
Knowles pin nail
Knowles scissors
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In this case report, we describe a rare clinical situation of acute arterial thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) after osteosynthesis, using an intramedullary Knowles pin, to treat nonunion of a midshaft clavicular fracture.
A revision osteosynthesis was performed using an open procedure without fluoroscopy guidance, and a 3.2 mm Knowles pin (Zimmer) was used for fixation.{Figure 1}{Figure 2}
Postoperative radiographs revealed malpositioning of the Knowles pin [Figure 2]b, with intimal dissection of the left subclavian artery and high-grade stenosis [6] evident on computed tomography angiography [Figure 3].
There is limited evidence of iatrogenic causes of TOS after clavicular osteosynthesis, with reported late-onset of TOS attributed to misalignment of the fracture, excessive callus, nonunion and screw impingement after plating.[8],[12],[13] In our case, acute arterial TOS developed following revision osteosynthesis using an intramedullary Knowles pin and caused acute limb ischemia requiring immediate thrombolysis.[9] Based on this, we searched for previously described preventative methods.
reported a case of clavicular nonunion complicated with venous and neurogenic TOS, in which bone union was achieved by revision osteosynthesis using a Knowles pin and an autogenous bone marrow graft.[4] Our patient had initially been treated using a precontoured anatomical locking plate.
To our knowledge, this is the first case to describe TOS as a complication of intramedullary fixation with a Knowles pin for nonunion of a clavicular fracture.
Clavicular nonunion associated with thoracic outlet syndrome treated with Knowles pin fixation, autogenous bone marrow graft, and autologous fibrin clots.
Transacromial Knowles pin in the treatment of Neer type 2 distal clavicle fractures: a prospective evaluation of 32 cases.
(20) Thirteen patients had their injury treated with transacromial wires and the other six were managed with a variety of other techniques (interfragmentary screws, tension band construct and Knowles pins).
Transacromial Knowles pins are another option for operative fixation of distal clavicle fractures.
The technique is variable and may involve the use of K-wires, threaded screws, Knowles pins, Hagie pins, or elastic titanium nails.
Neviaser in 1975 reported a 100% healing rate using Knowles pins. (29) In 1981, Zenni and colleagues reported on a mix of intramedullary fixation techniques, but had a 100% healing rate.