Kluver-Bucy syndrome

Klü·ver-Bu·cy syn·drome

(klē'vĕr bū'sē),
characterized by psychic blindness or hyperreactivity to visual stimuli, increased oral and sexual activity, and depressed drive and emotional reactions. Reported in monkeys after bilateral temporal lobe ablation, but rarely reported in humans.
A syndrome characterised by hypersexuality, visual agnosia, decreased recognition of people, loss of fear and anger responses, rage reactions, memory loss, seizures, dementia, excess oral behaviour, memory defects, and overreaction to visual stimuli
Aetiology Herpes encephalitis, trauma with bilateral damage to the anterior temporal lobes or due to temporal lobectomy

Kluver-Bucy syndrome

Psychiatry A syndrome following bilateral temporal lobe removal characterized by ↓ recognition of people, loss of fear, rage reactions, hypersexuality, excess oral behavior, memory defects, overreaction to visual stimuli

Bucy,

Paul C., U.S. neurosurgeon, 1904-1992.
Bucy cordotomy knife
Bucy knife
Bucy laminectomy rongeur
Bucy retractor
Bucy tube
Klüver-Bucy syndrome - see under Klüver

Klüver,

Heinrich, German-born U.S. neurologist, 1897-1979.
Klüver-Barrera Luxol fast blue stain - in combination with cresyl violet, a stain useful for demonstrating myelin and Nissl substance.
Klüver-Bucy syndrome - a syndrome mostly reported in monkeys, characterized by psychic blindness or hyperreactivity to visual stimuli, increased oral and sexual activity, and depressed drive and emotional reactions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, 'exp Dementia[MeSH]' searches all articles tagged with terms including Alzheimer's Disease, Huntington's Disease, Lewy Body Disease, and Kluver-Bucy Syndrome.
Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS), a rare neurobehavioral syndrome, was first described in 1939 by Kluver and Bucy in rhesus monkeys after the removal of greater portions of both temporal lobes and rhinencephalon (1).
Methotrexate leukoencephalopathy presenting as Kluver-Bucy syndrome and uncinate seizures.
Sertraline for Kluver-Bucy syndrome in an adolescent.
But Birmingham Crown Court heard a psychiatric report suggested a head injury from a road smash 20 years ago had left him with a rare condition - Kluver-Bucy syndrome - which may in part explain his behaviour.
2) As he so aptly put it, our patient exhibited three of the key diagnostic features of the Kluver-Bucy syndrome.
Kluver-Bucy syndrome as a result of minor head trauma.
To the Editor: Salim et al's (1) classification of their patient with a minor head injury as a case of Kluver-Bucy syndrome is open to question.
One of the most unique clinical disorders due to bitemporal lesions is the Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS).
Kluver-Bucy syndrome was initially described in primates after experimental bilateral temporal lobectomy.
Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) has been described as a disconnection of the temporal lobes from the remainder of the brain.
Kluver-Bucy syndrome was first recognized in humans in 1955, when a patient with refractory seizures had bilateral temporal lobectomy.