Klebsiella


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Klebsiella

 [kleb″se-al´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in nature and commonly found in the intestinal tract. They are a frequent cause of nosocomial urinary and pulmonary infections and wound infections. Species include K. pneumo´niae (also called K. friedlän´deri), the etiologic agent of Friedländer's pneumonia; K. pneumo´niae ozae´nae, which occurs in ozena and other respiratory diseases; and K. rhinosclero´matis, a species isolated from patients with rhinoscleroma.

Klebsiella

(kleb'sē-el'ă),
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative, encapsulated rods that occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. These organisms produce acetylmethylcarbinol and lysine decarboxylase or ornithine decarboxylase. They do not usually liquefy gelatin. Citrate and glucose are ordinarily used as sole carbon sources. These organisms may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain. The type species is Klebsiella pneumoniae.
[E. Klebs]

klebsiella

(klĕb′zē-ĕl′ə)
n.
A nonmotile, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium of the genus Klebsiella, such as K. pneumoniae, that causes pneumonia and other infections usually in patients with diminished immunity, such as diabetics and alcoholics.

Kleb·si·el·la

(kleb-sē-el'ă)
A genus of aerobic, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative, encapsulated rods that occur singly, in pairs, or in short chains. These organisms produce acetylmethylcarbinol and lysine decarboxylase or ornithine decarboxylase; they do not usually liquefy gelatin. Citrate and glucose are ordinarily used as sole carbon sources. These organisms may or may not be pathogenic. They occur in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain. The type species is K. pneumoniae.
[E. Klebs]

Klebs,

Theodor Albrecht Edwin, German physician, 1834-1913.
Klebsiella - a genus of bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) that occurs in the respiratory, intestinal, and urogenital tracts of humans as well as in soil, water, and grain.
Klebs disease
Klebs-Loeffler bacillus - a species that causes diphtheria and produces a powerful exotoxin causing degeneration of various tissues, notably myocardium. Synonym(s): Corynebacterium diphtheriae
Klebsiella oxytoca
Klebsiella pneumoniae - Synonym(s): Friedländer bacillus

Patient discussion about Klebsiella

Q. What is KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE 0.00

A. Klebsiella is a bacteria that can cause different types of infections such as a urinary tract infection or pneumonia, and is considered a not very common pathogen among patients in the community (meaning outside the hospital). It is known as a pathogen that attacks hospitalized patients at a higher frequency and needds good antibiotic treatment.

Q. Are superbugs contagious through the air? Last week we visited my dad in the hospital, and we noticed that on the next room’s door there was a warning sign. After asking, we were told it was a denoting that the patient inside had a superbug (called klebsiella). On our way out we passed against this patient in the hallway – is it possible that I also carry this superbag? Is it dangerous?

A. Usually these bacteria are transmitted from person to person through direct contact, and less through the air. Moreover, these germs are dangerous in ill and debilitated patients, and not in normal healthy individuals.

More discussions about Klebsiella
References in periodicals archive ?
A clandestine spot check at the facility on Tuesday and Wednesday showed that up to three children share a cot, putting them at risk of infecting each other with bugs like Klebsiella. By Thursday evening, KNH had not responded to our 16 calls and one email sent over two days.
The extracts killed the Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae at 2.0, 1.0, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.125 g/l except Klebsiella pneumoniae at 0.125 g/l.
But in an extreme environment deprived of all nutrients, Klebsiella reigned supreme while the bugs normally found in high abundance rapidly died off.
Out of total 170 carbapenem-resistant isolates, Acinetobacter species were 44.%, Pseudomonas species 34%, E.coli 7%, Klebsiella species 8%, Proteus species 3%, Citrobacter species 1%, Enterobacter species 0.7% Among these isolates MHT positivity was as followed Acinetobacter species were 53%, Pseudomonas species 51%, E.
The exact pathogenesis in which Klebsiella spp result in Mikulicz cell formation and eventual rhinoscleroma is unclear.
The objective of this study is to determine the optimum conditions of kerosene degradation using local isolate of Klebsiella pneumonia sp.
Although the validity of the string test in detecting metastatic Klebsiella is questionable, it is a simple and easy test that can be done in any laboratory indicating the presence of this organism.
This study reports high incidence of common environmental bacterial pathogens like E.coli, Klebsiella spp, Staphylococcus spp, Pseudomonas spp and Clostridium spp in post-mortem samples of ovine pneumonia.
The medical subject headings (MESH) and keywords used for the search were "Enterobacteriaceae" and "Klebsiella pneumoniae or K pneumoniae" and "Extended-spectrum [beta]-lactamases or ESBLs" and "CTX-M" and "Iran".
Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the Microbiology Department of The Children's Hospital and the Institute of Child Health in Lahore, Pakistan, from May 2014 to April 2015, in which isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae were screened by using the cefoxitin disc.
VIM was the most commonly identified carbapenemase after Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase.