Kinsey scale


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Related to Kinsey scale: Alfred Kinsey

Kinsey scale

n.
A classification system for gauging sexual orientation, designed by Alfred Kinsey, and ranging from 0 (exclusively heterosexual) to 6 (exclusively homosexual).
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We discovered that the Kinsey Scale, which really places individuals on a continuum from basically exclusively opposite-sex partners to exclusively same-sex partners, is really an oversimplification of the diversity of sexual behavior in humans," Ganna said.
Michael Storms (1980) echoed Klein's views on the deficiencies of the Kinsey Scale in the same year publishing his own model of sexuality.
(1948) revolutionized a great deal of thinking about human sexuality, overreliance on the Kinsey Scale does have some limitations.
While the Kinsey Scale has become a fixture in sexuality textbooks--and even popular culture--the rating system and Kinsey's findings regarding male bisexuality, and cultural influences on male sexuality in general, largely have been overlooked by today's sex researchers, according to the Center for Sexual Health Promotion (CSHP) at IU, which collaborated with Paul H.
A quiet, genial guy among these more boisterous types, John is hardly comfortable discussing his shifting Kinsey scale placement with them, and his new job as bottom-rung gofer at a major ad agency is fraught with sexual tension as a studly boss (Johnny Ray Rodriguez) barrages him with thinly veiled come-ons.
* The data from 16,000 adult males who also have taken the test show that 70% of adult men who molest boys score as being heterosexual on the Kinsey Scale. That is the exact percentage of men in the general population who score as heterosexual on the Kinsey Scale, Dr.
What would come to be known as the "Kinsey Scale" posited that sexual orientations form a continuum from 0 to 6, with 0 representing a totally heterosexual person and 6 a totally homosexual one, with many degrees of bisexuality in between.
A chart at the end of the book rates variety shows on the Kinsey scale (which ranks human sexuality on a 0-6 scale ranging from exclusively heterosexual to exclusively homosexual) of most gay ("as gay as it gets," "Look, Mary, a show for us, "don't ask, don't tell") to least gay ("a touch of pink," "as straight as it gets").
(Though, as she points out, the famous Kinsey scale has often been misinterpreted as replacing two categories--gay and straight--with six.) She writes approvingly also of Fritz Klein's Sexual Orientation Grid, developed in 1980, which incorporates fantasy into the Kinsey continuum and differentiates between "past," "present" and "ideal" orientation.
I felt like those conversations were huge at the rime, for all my queer friends, but in particular for those of us who didn't fit solidly at one end of the Kinsey Scale. And I wanted readers ...
But I think that sex and the Kinsey Scale and the whole bit--it's all such a personal thing that I really don't feel like I can comment freely on that and sort of have people read what I'm saying right now and have it be fact.
As the popularity of the Kinsey Sicks snowballed -- the name comes from the infamous Kinsey scale, six being the top of the chart in terms of homosexuality -- Schatz and his cohorts found it harder to keep two careers in gear.