porus

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porus

 [por´us] (L.)
porus acus´ticus exter´nus the outer end of the external acoustic meatus.
porus acus´ticus inter´nus the opening of the internal acoustic meatus in the cranial cavity.
porus op´ticus the opening in the sclera for passage of the optic nerve.

pore

(pōr),
1. An opening, hole, perforation, meatus, or foramen.
2. Synonym(s): sweat pore
Synonym(s): porus (1)

See also: opening, meatus, foramen.
[G. poros, passageway]

warble pore

an open connection between the surface of the skin and the embedded larvae as seen in warbles (Hypoderma sp.).
Synonym(s): porus

porus

/po·rus/ (por´us) pl. po´ri   [L.] an opening or pore.
porus acus´ticus exter´nus  the outer end of the external acoustic meatus.
porus acus´ticus inter´nus  the opening of the internal acoustic meatus.
porus op´ticus  the opening in the sclera for passage of the optic nerve.

porus

pl. pori [L.] an opening or pore.

porus acusticus externus
the outer end of the external acoustic meatus.
porus acusticus internus
the opening of the internal acoustic meatus in the cranial cavity.
porus opticus
the opening in the sclera for passage of the optic nerve.
References in periodicals archive ?
Greeks defeated King Porus with 'great difficulty' says Plutarch.
Alexander the Great battled King Porus on his elephant in 325 B.
The battle of the Hydaspes River was fought by Alexander the Great in 326 BC against King Porus of the Hindu Paurava Kingdom on the banks of the Hydaspes River (Jhelum River) in the Punjab near Bhera (Pind Dadan Khan) in modern-day Pakistan.
King Porus and Alexandar's wife: Another rakhi tale comes from the battle between Alexander, the Greek king and Porus, the Hindu king.
Masson mistook the ruins (in Montgomery district of the Punjab of British India) for the ancient city of Sangala, the capital of King Porus, who was defeated by the ruler of Macedonia, Alexander, when the latter invaded the Indian subcontinent in 327 Be.
23) With decor, for instance, he works out details of which tree-flats need to be practicable, which side of the stage the tents are to be on, and how big the boat needs to be in Issipile; and in Alessandro he has a ready solution to the apparent problem of secreting King Porus and his general Gandartes from Alexander the Great and the rest of the characters at the start of the climactic temple scene.
You can argue that this isn't 326 BC when Alexander invaded India and through a combination of guile and might overthrew the much larger, but much more corpulent forces of the Indian king Porus.