horn

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Related to King Horn: Havelok the Dane

horn

 [horn]
1. a pointed projection such as the paired processes on the head of various animals, or other structure resembling them in shape.
2. an excrescence or projection shaped like the horn of an animal.
anterior horn of spinal cord the horn-shaped configuration presented by the anterior column of the spinal cord in transverse section; called also ventral horn of spinal cord.
cicatricial horn a hard, dry outgrowth from a scar, often scaly and occasionally osseous.
dorsal horn of spinal cord posterior horn of spinal cord.
lateral horn of spinal cord the horn-shaped configuration presented by the lateral column of the spinal cord in transverse section.
posterior horn of spinal cord the horn-shaped configuration presented by the posterior column of the spinal cord in transverse section; called also dorsal horn of spinal cord.
sebaceous horn a hard outgrowth of the contents of a sebaceous cyst.
ventral horn of spinal cord anterior horn of spinal cord.
warty horn a hard, pointed outgrowth of a wart.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

horn

(hōrn), [TA]
Any structure resembling a horn in shape.
Synonym(s): cornu (1)
[A.S.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

horn

(hôrn)
n.
1. One of the hard, usually permanent structures projecting from the head of certain mammals, such as cattle, sheep, goats, or antelopes, consisting of a bony core covered with a sheath of keratinous material.
2. A hard protuberance, such as an antler or projection on the head of a giraffe or rhinoceros, that is similar to or suggestive of a horn.
3.
a. The hard smooth keratinous material forming the outer covering of the horns of cattle or related animals.
b. A natural or synthetic substance resembling this material.

horn adj.
horn′ist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

horn

(hōrn) [TA]
1. A hard projection; consisting largely of compact keratin, tapering to a point, usually paired, on the head of certain mammals.
2. Any structure resembling a horn in shape.
Synonym(s): cornu (1) .
[A.S.]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

horn

A rare, age-related local overgrowth of the horny layer of the skin so that a short, cylindrical, horn-like protrusion occurs. Cutaneous horns are easily removed but the base may be found to be cancerous.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

horn

(hōrn) [TA]
Any structure resembling a horn in shape.
Synonym(s): cornu (1) .
[A.S.]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Gadowski, "Narrative Style in King Horn and Havelok the Dane," Journal of Narrative Technique 15.2 (1985): 143.
(87) See Stuart, "Havelok the Dane," 358; Gary Lim, "In the Name of the (Dead) Father: Reading Fathers and Sons in Havelok the Dane, King Horn, and Bevis of Hampton," JEGP 110.1 (2011): 42-47; Staines, "Havelok the Dane," 613.
The Enseignements of Louis IX is not a narrative piece like King Horn or the Vita Sancti Ethelberti, but a representation, ostensibly a reportage, of Louis's speech, a sequence of his injunctions to his son.
Thus in King Horn, Horn himself has an opposite in Aylmer, the father of Rymenhild, who initially gives Horn refuge.
Like the Vita Sancti Ethelberti and King Horn, Le Roi d'Angleterre shows a king being tested; but it is neither his faith that is tested, nor his loyalty to his lover or to the memory of his ancestors, but his ability to respond to the powers of wit, and in this he proves inadequate.
An earlier text, the thirteenth-century King Horn, takes an even more legalistic approach than that of Syr Launfal to its own central relationship, the love between its eponymous hero and the maiden Rymenhild.
Ultimately, King Horn replicates this evolution in its own structure and reworks romance convention to present the quest of the individual knight in marital terms.
Like Syr Launfal, however, King Horn presents marriage as the means through which its hero gains access to knighthood and ultimately regains a public persona that is consonant with his "true" self.
3-74; Four Romances of England: King Horn, Havelok the Dane, Bevis of Hampton, Athelston, ed.
(5) For complete paleographic and codicological descriptions of the manuscript, see Rosamund Allen, King Horn: An Edition Based on Cambridge University Library MS Gg.4.27 (2) (New York: Garland, 1984), pp.
(9) The Laud SEL was collated early in the fourteenth century with the quire that contains Havelok and King Horn. See Kimberly K.
Gadomski, 'Narrative Style in King Horn and Havelok the Dane', Journal of Narrative Technique, 15 (1985), 133-45 (pp.