proprioception

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proprioception

 [pro″pre-o-sep´shun]
perception mediated by proprioceptors or proprioceptive tissues.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

pro·pri·o·cep·tion

(prō'prē-ō-sep'shŭn),
A sense or perception, usually at a subconscious level, of the movements and position of the body and especially its limbs, independent of vision; this sense is gained primarily from input from sensory nerve terminals in muscles and tendons (muscle spindles) and the fibrous capsule of joints combined with input from the vestibular apparatus.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

proprioception

(prō′prē-ō-sĕp′shən)
n.
The unconscious perception of movement and spatial orientation arising from stimuli within the body itself.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

proprioception

(1) The internal sense of the relative position of the body’s musculoskeletal units with each other and the effort needed to move them.
(2) Kinaesthetic sense, see there.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

proprioception

Neurology The subconscious sensation of body and limb movement and position, obtained from non-visual sensory input from muscle spindles and joint capsules
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

pro·pri·o·cep·tion

(prō'prē-ō-sep'shŭn)
A sense or perception, usually at a subconscious level, of the movements and position of the body and especially its limbs, independent of vision; this sense is gained primarily from input from sensory nerve terminals in muscles and tendons (muscle spindles) and the fibrous capsule of joints combined with input from the vestibular apparatus.
See also: exteroceptor
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

proprioception

Awareness of the position in space, and of the relation to the rest of the body, of any body part. Proprioceptive information is essential to the normal functioning of the body's mechanical control system and is normally acquired unconsciously from sense receptors in the muscles, joints, tendons and the balance organ of the inner ear.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

proprioception 

Awareness of posture, balance or position due to the reception of stimuli, produced within the organism, which stimulate receptors (called proprioceptors) located within muscles, tendons, joints and the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear. The precise role of proprioception regarding the visual apparatus is uncertain. See Table N1; tonic neck reflex.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann