kinase

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kinase

 [ki´nās]
1. a subclass of the transferases, comprising the enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a high-energy group from a donor (usually ATP) to an acceptor, and named, according to the acceptor, as creatine kinase, fructokinase, etc.
2. an enzyme that activates a zymogen, named, according to its source, such as enterokinase, streptokinase, etc.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ki·nase

(kī'nās),
1. Enzyme that catalyzes conversion of a proenzyme to an active one (for example, enteropeptidase [enterokinase]). Important in salvage and recycling of nucleotides. Some antiviral agents work by inactivating viral or tumor kinases
2. Suffix attached to some enzymes to indicate transformation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kinase

(kī′nās′, -nāz′, kĭn′ās′, -āz′)
n.
Any of various enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a phosphate group from a donor, such as ADP or ATP, to an acceptor protein. Kinases regulate many essential cellular processes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

ki·nase

(kī'nās)
1. An enzyme catalyzing the conversion of a proenzyme to an active enzyme.
2. An enzyme catalyzing the transfer of phosphate groups to form triphosphates (e.g., adenosine triphosphate).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kinase

See TRANSFERASE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

kinase

an enzyme that catalyses the transfer of a phosphoryl group from ATP to another compound.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
However, under oxidizing conditions, the increased level of intracellular ROS promotes the dissociation of Nrf2 and Keap1, either by the oxidization of key reactive cysteine residues (Cys273, Cys288, and Cys151) that govern Keap1 activity or via the activation of kinases, such as protein kinase C (PKC), MAPK, phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), and protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) that phosphorylate Nrf2 [79-81].
We report here that the cytosolic tyrosine kinase Src can regulate EGFR activity, further modulating [O.sub.3]-induced IL-8 expression.
Several kinases, such as BubR1 and Bub1 (checkpoint kinases), Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1), Chkl (checkpoint kinase 1), tousled-like kinase-1, Plk1, and TD-60/RCC2 (regulator of chromosome condensation 2), have been recently shown to be involved in Aurora-B activation.
In the current set of investigations, we are studying the expression of splicing factors which are the major deregulated family proteins in maneuvering the alternative splicing event to escape apoptotic pathway, potentially could be explained after using small molecular inhibitors against Akt kinase and GSK3beta with ability to restrict the occurrence of alternative pathway either by reversing or decreases the occurrence of alternative splicing, and will possibly help in restricting the tumor genetic heterogeneity.
Kinase is an enzyme class that helps to transfer phosphate groups to certain substrate from high energy molecules such as adenosine triphosphate (ADP).
Plant receptor-like serine threonine kinases: roles in signaling and plant defense.
This allows for inhibition of both primary and secondary mutations that shift the kinase towards its active conformation.
PIM kinases named for the genomic site, Proviral Integration site of Moloney Murine leukemia virus.
Abbreviations CNS: Central nervous system EGFR: Epidermal growth factor receptor ER: Endoplasmic reticulum FAK: Focal adhesion kinase IR: Insulin receptor NLR: NOD-like receptors NO: Nitric oxide NOS: Nitric oxide synthase PDGF: Platelet-derived growth factor PP2: 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazolo [3, 4-d] pyrimidine PTKs: Protein tyrosine kinases PTPs: Protein tyrosine phosphatases ROS: Reactive oxygen species RTK: Receptor tyrosine kinases.
In consequence, the aforementioned information adopted in the existing methods may not fully determine the corresponding protein kinase. It is well known that one protein kinase can catalyze multiple phosphorylation sites and one phosphorylation site can also be phosphorylated by multiple protein kinases [22-24].
The MAPK signaling pathway comprises 4 distinct cascades, designated as extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), Jun amino-terminal kinases 1/2/3 (JNK1/2/3), p38-MAPK, and extracellular signal regulated kinase 5 (ERK5), according to their most downstream kinase tier.