kin selection

(redirected from Kin altruism)
Also found in: Dictionary.

kin selection

n.
A biological theory stating that a gene that causes an organism to exhibit behavior detrimental to its survival will increase in frequency in a population if that behavior benefits the organism's relatives, which will pass the gene on to subsequent generations.

kin selection

a form of selection favouring altruistic (self-sacrificing) behaviour towards relatives. Such a process ensures that even if the chances of an individual's survival are reduced, some of his or here genes will survive in the relative.
References in periodicals archive ?
The details here are important, since many working in evolutionary ethics presuppose a strong kin selection component in our disposition for altruistic behaviour--this despite the fact that, 'long before our last common ancestor with the chimps (about 5 million years ago), all the primates had ceased to live in groups in which kin altruism would be selected for' (188).
Browning eschews any sort of divine command theory of ethics, substantially rejects the notion of a sacrificial ethic, and insists that a Christian love ethic only makes sense in relation to its purported origins in a primeval "kin altruism." He does invoke Christian theologians like Reinhold Niebuhr, Paul Ricoeur, and the Roman Catholic Louis Janssens, but offers their various contributions as Christian adumbrations of basic observations of evolutionary psychology.