kilojoule

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kil·o·joule

(kil'ō-jūl),
A unit of energy, work, or quantity of heat equal to 103 joules.
[kilo + joule]

kil·o·joule

(kil'ŏ-jūl)
1000 joules.

kilojoule

(kil′ŏ-jool″) [ kilo- + joule],

kJ

One thousand joules. Nutritionally, one kilojoule is equal to one calorie.
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References in periodicals archive ?
It is estimated that people exert about 175 calories (732 kilojoules) less each day than they did in the 1960s, and do about 20 per cent less physical activity.
You've probably already forked out an arm and a leg for your airfare and accommodation, so save on the trains, buses and/or car rental and instead torch some mega kilojoules and tone your legs by walking .
At baseline, participants were consuming adequate kilojoules and protein as per evidence-based guidelines (Ash et al., 2006).
Most pre-packed foods have a nutrition label that usually includes information on energy in kilojoules (kJ) or kilocalories (kcal), usually referred to as calories.
The calibre was indeed brought out with a 286gr bullet which generated just under five kilojoules of energy at the muzzle, and was at one time the most widely-used intermediate rifle in Africa.
The Izod strength of notched/ unnotched specimens were conducted (the impact energy used to break a notched/unnotched specimen is divided by the thickness of the specimen at the notch), expressed in kilojoules per meter (kJ/m).
Ultra-poverty was defined in terms of the inability to regularly access 2100 kcal (8790 kilojoules) energy consumption per person, per day.
Even more obscure measures of decibels, kilojoules, social savings, carbon tons, acres eviscerated, or jobs created and lost do not exhaust all possible considerations.
Indeed, as long ago as 1988, scientists at the University of Rochester achieved compression of deuterium-tritium fuel capsules to 100200 liquid density using direct drive and only 2 kilojoules of laser light (approximately 700-1000-fold compression is needed for fusion power plants).
The metric scale, the one used in scientific work, is kilojoules of energy, per kilogram of mass-kelvins, where Kelvin is the absolute celcius scale.
This will save you at least 50 per cent extra calories or kilojoules.