Kiernan


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Kier·nan

(kēr'năn),
Francis, English physician, 1800-1874. See: Kiernan space.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bonnie Kiernan said yesterday afternoon that Douglas police "barged" unannounced and without a search warrant into her Bowen Court home between 11:30 a.m.
Kiernan, while doing his MSc in Politcal Science at the University of Edinburgh.
Kiernan, for more than 10 years president of the National Parks Conservation Association, has been named to succeed Lew Feldstein, longtime president of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation.
The bus was moving through the city of North Lauderdale on Thursday when passenger James Kiernan received a text message about Jackson's death on his cell phone, and he read it aloud on the bus, the Broward County Sheriff's Department said.
By Ben Kiernan. (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2007.
LAST Wednesday's juvenile fillies' maiden at Naas looked a smart contest, and we should certainly hear more about the first two, Kitty Kiernan, a Pivotal filly from the Jim Bolger stable, and the eye-catching runner-up Lillie Langtry, a Ballydoyle-trained daughter of Danehill Dancer.
Mr Kiernan joined the Navy aged 18 and during World War II served on destroyers defending North Atlantic convoys.
Now more than ever, businesses and investors who want to be successful must incorporate environmental and social issues into their decision-making processes, says sustainable-investment advisor Kiernan. He notes that, until now, most institutional investors have not given much thought to their investment portfolios' sustainability quotients, but a gathering storm of worldwide trends is making it highly prudent for them to start doing so.
Ian Kiernan, a solo round-the-world yachtsman and founder of Clean Up Australia, has owned Sanyo Marls for 38 years but the boat now has three other part-owners, including brother and sister duo Tiare Tomaszewki and Ben Hawke, whose grandfather, the marine artist Jack Earl, was the original owner of Marls.
Reporting about medicine and science is an area critical to the public interest, the author Vincent Kiernan argues, but separating out the special interests involved in funding and supporting scientific peer reviewed research makes discerning what is in the common good a complex argument.
A little more than two centuries later, in 1856, the San Francisco Bulletin editorialized about clashes with the more than 100 Indian groups in California, "Extermination is the quickest and cheapest remedy, and effectually prevents all other difficulties when an outbreak occurs." That quotation appears in a chapter with the title "Genocide in the United States" in author Ben Kiernan's huge history of campaigns to wipe out groups of people.
Kiernan (history, Yale U.) combines narrative description with documentary materials in order to present a comparative look at the Cambodian genocide perpetrated by Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge and the East Timorese genocide perpetrated by the Indonesian government and military, as well the indigenous resistance movements that developed in both cases.