Kienbock

Kien·böck

(kēn'bōk),
Robert, Austrian roentgenologist, 1871-1953. See: Kienböck disease, Kienböck unit.
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She was diagnosed with osteochondritis of lunate, also known as Kienbock's disease, and was managed elsewhere for one month leading to no relief.
Debido a estas caracteristicas se le emplea en cirugia plastica reconstructiva, en cirugia de mano para injertos de tendon (Sebastin et al., 2005a,b; Twoon et al.), en aumento de labios (Davidson, 1995), en correccion de ptosis (Chauhan, 2003), en la paralisis facial (Atiyeh et al., 1998), en el sindrome del tunel carpiano grave (Park et al., 2010) y en la artroplastia de reseccion causada por la enfermedad de Kienbock (Kucuk et al., 2011).
Yuan, "3D printing lunate prosthesis for stage IIIc Kienbock's disease: a case report," Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, vol.
Trabecular microstructure of the human lunate in Kienbock's disease.
(56,57) It has been most commonly reported in the femoral head, (56-58) although atypical presentations have been reported, including Kienbock disease.
Avascular necrosis (AVN) of the lunate (Kienbock's disease) is characterized initially by high signal intensity on fluid sensitive sequences, with low signal intensity on all sequences later in disease progression.
I suffered from Kienbock's disease, which is a breakdown of the lunate bone in the wrist when I started bodybuilding in 2006 in Australia.
Kienbock's disease is an unusual problem that causes osteonecrosis and collapse of the lunate bone, which leads to chronic dysfunction and pain.
Kienbock's disease is a painful idiopathic disorder of the wrist in which roentgenograms show avascular necrosis of the carpal lunate.
Kienbock's disease, also known as lunatomalacia, was first described in the literature by Robert Kienbock in 1910 as ligamentous trauma to the lunate resulting in the interruption of internal arterial supply to the bone.
* pain on end extension: occult ganglion, Kienbock disease, flexor carpi radialis (FCR) tendonitis