keloid

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Related to Keloid scar: Hypertrophic scar

keloid

 [ke´loid]
a sharply elevated, irregularly shaped, progressively enlarging scar, due to excessive collagen formation in the corium during connective tissue repair. It is a benign tumor that usually has its origin in a scar from surgery or a burn or other injury; keloids are generally considered harmless and noncancerous, although they may produce contractures or cosmetic alterations that affect body image. Ordinarily they cause no trouble beyond an occasional itching sensation. Surgical removal is not usually effective because it results in a high rate of recurrence. However, intralesional injection of steroids, cryotherapy, and x-ray therapy often are of substantial help. When x-ray therapy is employed, care must be taken not to destroy the surrounding healthy tissue. adj., adj keloid´al.
Keloid. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ke·loid

(kē'loyd),
A nodular, firm, movable, nonencapsulated, often linear mass of hyperplastic scar tissue, tender and frequently painful, consisting of wide irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis and adjacent subcutaneous tissue, usually after trauma, surgery, a burn, or severe cutaneous disease such as cystic acne, and is more common in blacks.
Synonym(s): cheloid
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

keloid

also

cheloid

(kē′loid′)
n.
A red, raised formation of fibrous scar tissue caused by excessive tissue repair in response to trauma or surgical incision.

ke·loid′al (-loid′l) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

keloid

Hypertrophic scar Dermatology A thick, irregular and indurated skin scar of adults aged 15-45 that is 6-fold more common in dark-skinned persons and in ♀; keloids occur in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and are associated with infections, burns, trauma, insect bites Management Local steroid injections to relieve pruritus or ↓ size of early lesions; post-excisional recurrence is common
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ke·loid

(kē'loyd)
A nodular, firm, often linear mass of hyperplastic thickish scar tissue, consisting of irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis, usually after trauma, surgery, a burn, or severe cutaneous disease.
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

keloid

(kē′lŏyd) [Gr. kele, tumor, + eidos, form, shape]
Enlarge picture
KELOID
An exuberant scar that forms at the site of an injury (or an incision) and spreads beyond the borders of the original lesion. The scar is made up of a swirling mass of collagen fibers and fibroblasts. Grossly it appears to have a shiny surface and a rubbery consistency. The most common locations for keloid formation are on the shoulders, chest, and back. See: illustration

Treatment

The injection of a corticosteroid sometimes helps the lesion regress. Freezing the tissue with liquid nitrogen, applying pressure dressings, treating it with lasers, excising it surgically, or a combination of these treatments may be used, but recurrences are frequent.

acne keloid

A keloid that develops at the site of an acne pustule.
illustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

keloid

An abnormal healing response causing scars that are markedly overgrown, thickened and disfiguring. Keloids are commoner in black people than in white and may follow any injury or surgical incision. Surgical removal of keloids is followed by even more extensive keloid formation but they can be helped by injection of corticosteroid drugs. Untreated keloids eventually flatten.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Keloid

An unusual or abnormal growth of scar tissue, as in the third stage of granuloma inguinale.
Mentioned in: Granuloma Inguinale
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ke·loid

(kē'loyd)
A nodular, firm, often linear mass of hyperplastic thickish scar tissue, consisting of irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis.
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Other diagnoses include cutaneous leishmaniasis, as occurred for 2 of the soldiers, as well as diffuse leishmaniasis, chromomycosis, sporotrichosis, lepromatous or tuberculoid dimorphic leprosy, mycetoma, phaeohyphomycosis, pyoderma, Kaposi sarcoma, sarcoidosis, keloid scars, histiocytosis of Langerhans cells, melanoma, dermatofibrosarcoma, lymphoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and cutaneous metastases (3,17,40,41).
Caption: Figure 2: Severe left ring finger contracture with palmar fibromatosis and keloid scar formation.
Comparison of a silicone gel-filled cushion and silicon gel sheeting for the treatment of hypertrophic or keloid scars. Dermatol Surg 1999;25(6):484-6.
TA could be the new therapeutical application for treating keloid scars. With the development of the advanced technologies, hundreds and thousands of treatments on keloid scar have been reported.
Remlarsen is currently being evaluated in a Phase 2 clinical trial assessing its safety, tolerability, and activity in the potential prevention or reduction of keloid formation in subjects with a history of keloid scars, a form of pathological scarring.
Having a better understanding of piercing art is important for dermatologists and dermatologic surgeons because we sometimes treat the sequelae, including infection, allergic reactions from the jewelry, and keloid scars. Patients may intentionally create large size piercings, known as gauge piercings, and decide later they no longer want them.
The efficacy of topical silicone gel elastomers in the treatment of hypertrophic scars, keloid scars, and post-laser exfoliation erythema.
Qualified scars included linear or widespread hypertrophic or keloid scars. Scars were evaluated using the validated Vancouver Scar Scale, or VSS.
The thickest of the keloid scars were surgically removed after three years and even now are still pink in places.
Long-term outcome of intralesional injection of triamcinolone acetonide for the treatment of keloid scars in Asian patients.
2) I saw three keloid scars due to cuts on the wrist of another inmate.