Kegel exercise

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Kegel exercise

(kā′gəl)
n.
Any of various exercises involving controlled contraction and release of the muscles at the base of the pelvis, used especially as a treatment for urinary incontinence.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Kegel exercise

(ka'gel)
[Arnold H. Kegel, U.S. gynecologist, 1894–1981]
An exercise for strengthening the pubococcygeal and levator ani muscles. The patient should repeatedly and rapidly alternate contracting and relaxing the muscles for 10 seconds; relax for 20 seconds, then sustain the contraction for 10 to 20 seconds; the patient should then rest for 10 seconds and repeat the routine until fatigued. The number of repetitions should be increased gradually to between 50 and 150 per day.
Synonym: pelvic floor exercise See: incontinence, stress urinary
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
We've been hearing for years now about the importance of doing pelvic floor exercises (aka: Kegel excercises), but many of us still have questions.
Treating the Problem If you have stress incontinence, your doctor will likely recommend Kegel exercises.
The purpose of the present study was to design of booklet about all information of Kegel exercises by Arabic language as ahealthawarenessprogram from prostatitis.
Teaching pelvic floor exercises, commonly called Kegel exercises, needs to be done thoroughly and appropriately.
Regularly doing Kegel exercises--squeezing and releasing your pelvic floor muscles--is the best way to strengthen the muscles that control urination, deMille stresses.
Though people can do Kegel exercises on their own, working with a specialized therapist to learn other ways to manipulate the muscles of the pelvic floor can help control urgency and leakage.
Kegel exercises help strengthen the muscles that support the bladder, the uterus, and bowels.
Kegel exercises which was long known to help women with childbirth and recovery have been recommended for men as well by experts.
You're doing kegels right now," reads the poster from Veria Living, a TV channel that promotes living a healthy lifestyle, according to the New York Post.
"You can do behavior modification and Kegels on the patients we operate on, and they don't help them a bit," Dr.
Lucky for you, busy power-lesbian, just like talking to your girl on your BlackBerry, even Kegels have gone hands free.