Kegel exercise

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Kegel exercise

(kā′gəl)
n.
Any of various exercises involving controlled contraction and release of the muscles at the base of the pelvis, used especially as a treatment for urinary incontinence.

Kegel exercise

(ka'gel)
[Arnold H. Kegel, U.S. gynecologist, 1894–1981]
An exercise for strengthening the pubococcygeal and levator ani muscles. The patient should repeatedly and rapidly alternate contracting and relaxing the muscles for 10 seconds; relax for 20 seconds, then sustain the contraction for 10 to 20 seconds; the patient should then rest for 10 seconds and repeat the routine until fatigued. The number of repetitions should be increased gradually to between 50 and 150 per day.
Synonym: pelvic floor exercise See: incontinence, stress urinary
References in periodicals archive ?
Pelvic floor exercises, or Kegels, are often associated with improving women's sexual health," explained Liz Miracle, MSPT, WCS, and Assistant Clinical Professor at UCSF.
Kegel exercises which was long known to help women with childbirth and recovery have been recommended for men as well by experts.
Kegel exercises are practised by some women to tone up after childbirth.
Hulme and Nevin30 compared the Beyond Kegels protocol with traditional Kegel exercises in 64 females with stress, urge, or mixed incontinence.
Biofeedback can be used in conjunction with Kegels.
The patient will hold each slow Kegels for a number of seconds, and rest for the same number of seconds.
Kegel exercises strengthen and tone the pelvic muscles, helping relieve the occasional incontinence that may follow childbirth or menopause.
If a patient practices Kegels only when she urinates, then she's only practicing about 10 times a day Tell her that Kegels are like a medicine that she has to take throughout the day for them to be effective," he said.
As more people played, extra kegels were added to make the game harder.
8220;Women are frustrated by the often ineffective solution of “just do your Kegels” - Kegels alone are unlikely to provide the kind of strength required to run and jump with confidence and comfort.
Kegels (Pelvic floor contractions): Kegel exercises strengthen the pelvic floor muscles, which support the uterus, bladder and bowel.