Keeley cure

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Keeley cure

Medical history
A treatment for alcoholism and other addictions that was promulgated in the late 19th century by an American physician, Leslie E Keeley (1834–1900). Keeley’s remedies were packaged in triangular bottles, contained trace amounts of gold and marketed as therapies for drunkenness, opium habit and neurasthenia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lynn Neville brought the history of the Keeley Institute to life for those attending a recent meeting of Dwight Historical Society at the Prairie Creek Public Library in Dwight.
The location was appropriate because the building itself is the former clubhouse utilized by patients at the Keeley Institute, located adjacent to the Country Mansion restaurant, also a former Keeley building.
Between 1891 and 1965, the Keeley Institute had more than 126 Keeley franchises in operation."
to work together to improve the village and keep the Keeley Institute in Dwight.
In 1879 Keeley first combined the special ingredients of his "Bichloride of Gold" nostrum, followed a few years later by the creation of the august-sounding Keeley institute in Dwight, Illinois.
Over the years, an estimated 400,000 people underwent treatment at a Keeley Institute. The scare fell apart when a 1907 lawsuit exposed the ingredients of the Gold Cure compound to be strychnine, atropine (the drug ophthalmologists use to dilate pupils), boric acid, and water.