Kearns-Sayre syndrome

(redirected from Kearns-Sayer syndrome)

Kearns-Sayre syn·drome

(kernz sār), [MIM*530000]
a form of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with associated cardiac conduction defects, short stature, and hearing loss; a sporadically occurring mitochondrial myopathy presenting in childhood.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Kearns-Sayre syndrome

A mitochondrial disease characterized by chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia–paralysis of ocular muscles and mitochondrial myopathy combined with retinal deterioration, heart disease, hearing loss, DM, renal disease See Mitochondrial disease.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Kearns-Sayre syn·drome

(kĕrnz sār sindrōm)
A form of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with associated cardiac conduction defects, short stature, and hearing loss; a sporadically occurring mitochondrial myopathy presenting in childhood.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS)

A syndrome caused by major rearrangements of, and often large deletions from, the MITOCHONDRIAL DNA. The condition features paralysis of the eye-moving muscles with double vision; drooping eyelids; degeneration of the retinas; defects in the conducting muscle tissue of the heart; respiratory distress; and in some cases staggering walk, deafness and DIABETES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Kearns,

Thomas P., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1922–.
Kearns-Sayre syndrome - chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with associated cardiac conduction defects, short stature, and hearing loss.

Sayre,

George P., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1911–.
Kearns-Sayre syndrome - see under Kearns
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012

Kearns-Sayre syn·drome

(kĕrnz sār sindrōm) [MIM*530000]
Chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with associated cardiac conduction defects, short stature, and hearing loss.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Jack lives with a rare cell condition called Kearns-Sayer Syndrome, a life-limiting problem that affects his major organs and tissues.