Katayama syndrome

Ka·ta·ya·ma dis·ease

(kat'a-yă-mă),
acute early egg-laying phase of schistosomiasis, a toxemic syndrome in heavy primary infections, rarely seen in chronic cases. It is considered a form of immune complex disease or serum sickness-like condition. Described for schistosomiasis japonica, but observed with other forms as well.
[town in Japan where the d. is common]

Katayama syndrome

A set of allergic phenomena associated with the penetration of the skin and invasion of the body by the larval stage (CERCARIAE) of SCHISTOSOMIASIS. The effects include local itching, URTICARIA, fever, headache, muscle aches, abdominal pain, cough, patchy pneumonia and enlargement of the SPLEEN. (Kunika Katayama, 1856–1931, Japanese physician)
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, fever, hypereosinophilia, cough, and abdominal discomfort developed in the mother and both children 6-8 weeks after they had been swimming; these symptoms were indicative of Katayama syndrome.
In this case, the full-blown Katayama syndrome contributed to the evidence.
Furthermore, Katayama syndrome may occur as early as 3 weeks after exposure.