Katayama fever


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Katayama fever

 
acute systemic schistosomiasis causing a distinct serum sickness–like syndrome, usually associated with heavy infection by Schistosoma japonicum, characterized by fever, chills, nausea and vomiting, cough, headache, urticaria, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, marked eosinophilia, and usually increased levels of IgE and IgG. It was first reported from the Katayama River Valley in Japan.

Ka·ta·ya·ma dis·ease

(kat'a-yă-mă),
acute early egg-laying phase of schistosomiasis, a toxemic syndrome in heavy primary infections, rarely seen in chronic cases. It is considered a form of immune complex disease or serum sickness-like condition. Described for schistosomiasis japonica, but observed with other forms as well.
[town in Japan where the d. is common]

Katayama fever

A systemic allergic reaction to invasion of the body by Schistosoma larvae. It is marked by fevers, an urticarial rash, cough, enlargement of the lymph nodes and viscera, and eosinophilia.
See also: fever

Katayama fever

(kot-a-yom'a) [ Katayama River Valley in Japan, where the disease was first identified] See: fever

Katayama fever

A manifestation of acute SCHISTOSOMIASIS believed to be an immune complex response to eggs laid by maturing schistosomes. Four to six weeks after a schistosomal infection there is fever, enlarged liver and spleen, an urticarial rash and an asthma-like bronchospasm. The diagnosis is important because lack of treatment may lead to severe and permanent neurological damage.
References in periodicals archive ?
In patients presenting with Katayama fever, a second course of praziquantel should be given after 1 month to ensure eradication of any adult worms that may have been developing at the time of initial treatment.
There are no randomised controlled trials studying the role of steroids in the treatment of Katayama fever.