Kassebaum-Kennedy bill

Kassebaum-Kennedy bill

Health Insurance Portability & Accountability Act of 1996, see there.
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See also: Kassebaum-Kennedy Bill High On Dole, Clinton Agendas Daschle Withdraws Nomination
From the establishment of neighborhood health clinics 30 years ago, to the Americans with Disabilities Act, to greater funding for health research, to the Kassebaum-Kennedy bill that protects people's healthcare when they change or lose their jobs, to children's health reform with Senator Orrin Hatch (R-UT).
The result was the Kassebaum-Kennedy Bill, entitled the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), signed into law (Public Law 104-191) by President Clinton on August 21, 1996.
Last August, Congress passed the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (the Kassebaum-Kennedy Bill) which restricts the use of pre-existing condition exclusions in employer-sponsored group health insurance policies.
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, better known as the Kassebaum-Kennedy Bill, was the vehicle Congress chose to set a deadline for completing action on the privacy issue.
Both parties have hailed the Kassebaum-Kennedy bill as guaranteeing Americans the right to keep their health insurance when they change or lose their jobs.
Concerning health insurance, it has passed the bipartisan Kassebaum-Kennedy bill to correct two flagrant industry abuses-the excessive resort to exclusions for pre-existing conditions and the loss of coverage when employees lose or change their jobs.
The latest proposals before federal lawmakers are the Kassebaum-Kennedy bill in the Senate and a similar though more sweeping measure recently passed in the House of Representatives.
Lots of positive political rhetoric was espoused before the 1996 election about the passage of the Kassebaum-Kennedy Bill improving the portability of benefits and of mandating the option of a two-day hospital stay for a normal delivery.