Kashin-Beck disease

Kashin-Beck disease

 [kah´shēn bek]
a disabling degenerative disease of the peripheral joints and spine, endemic in eastern Siberia, northern China, and Korea; believed to be caused by ingestion of cereal grains infected with the fungus Fusarium sporotrichiella.

Kashin-Beck disease

(ka-shin′-bek)
[Nicolai Ivanovich Kashin, Russian military physician, 1825–1872; Evgeny Vladimirovich Beck (Bek), 20th-cent. Russian military physician]
Endemic polyarthritis typically found in children in Tibet, China, and neighboring regions. Its cause is unknown, but it is associated with the consumption of grains contaminated with fungi, with selenium deficiency, and possibly with iodine deficiency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Association Study of Polymorphisms in SelenoproteinGenes and Kashin-Beck Disease and Serum Selenium/Iodine Concentration in a Tibetan Population.
It is already known that selenium deficiency is the cause of Kashin-Beck disease and that taking supplements can help.
For example, elevated concentrations of chromium has been found in the hair of people suffering from diabetes mellitus while Kashin-Beck disease has been attributed to a selenium deficiency.
Kashin-Beck disease, which causes restriction of movement and joint deformity, is endemic to Tibet and associated with low socioeconomic status, poor diet, and iodine deficiency (Suetens et al 2001, Yang et al 2002).
In those regions, people frequently develop Kashin-Beck disease, which causes joint problems relatively early in life.
In this region two endemic diseases, Keshan disease (juvenile cardiomyopathy) and Kashin-Beck disease (osteoarthropathy), have been reported.
Chinese scientists have also described another disease that they attribute to selenium deficiency - Kashin-Beck disease, a form of osteoarthritis occurring during preadolescence and adolescence.