Kashin-Beck disease


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Kashin-Beck disease

 [kah´shēn bek]
a disabling degenerative disease of the peripheral joints and spine, endemic in eastern Siberia, northern China, and Korea; believed to be caused by ingestion of cereal grains infected with the fungus Fusarium sporotrichiella.

Kashin-Beck disease

(ka-shin′-bek)
[Nicolai Ivanovich Kashin, Russian military physician, 1825–1872; Evgeny Vladimirovich Beck (Bek), 20th-cent. Russian military physician]
Endemic polyarthritis typically found in children in Tibet, China, and neighboring regions. Its cause is unknown, but it is associated with the consumption of grains contaminated with fungi, with selenium deficiency, and possibly with iodine deficiency.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sokoloff, "The history of Kashin-Beck disease" New York State Journal of Medicine, vol.
Kang, "Selenium, iodine, and the relation with Kashin-Beck disease" Nutrition, vol.
Guo, "Progression and prospect of etiology and pathogenesis of Kashin-Beck disease" Journal of Xian Jiaotong University (Medical Sciences), vol.
Mo, "The role of low selenium in occurrence of Kashin-Beck disease," Chinese Journal of Control of Endemic Disease, vol.
Zhai, "Investigation on the relationship between Kashin-Beck disease and drinking water," in Proceedings of the International Workshop on Kashin-Beck Disease and Noncommunicable Diseases, pp.
Allander, "Kashin-Beck disease. An analysis of research and public health activities based on a bibliography 1849-1992," Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, vol.
Shi et al., "Articular cartilage metabolism in patients with Kashin-Beck Disease: an endemic osteoarthropathy in China," Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, vol.
Hinsenkamp, "Clinical manifestations of Kashin-Beck disease in Nyemo Valley, Tibet," International Orthopaedics, vol.
Xiong, "Diagnostic, clinical and radiological characteristics of Kashin-Beck disease in Shaanxi Province, PR China," International Orthopaedics, vol.
Guo, "Association of clinical features of bone and joint lesions between children and parents with Kashin-Beck disease in Northwest China," Clinical Rheumatology, vol.
Shen et al., "Clinical features of Kashin-Beck disease in adults younger than 50 years of age during a low incidence period: severe elbow and knee lesions," Clinical Rheumatology, vol.
Suetens C, Moreno-Reyes R, Chasseur C, Mathieu F, Begaux F, Haubruge E, et al (2001) Epidemiological support for a multifactorial aetiology of Kashin-Beck disease in Tibet.