Karenia brevis


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Karenia brevis

(kă-ren'ē-ă brev-is),
A dinoflagellate known for producing potent neurotoxins and accumulating in high concentrations in warm murine environments producing the phenomenon of red tide. The bloom of organisms may turn the water color red or golden; may reach a concentration of 20 million organisms per liter. Neurotoxin causes fish kill, or accumulation of toxin in shellfish (especially oysters, clams, and tiny mollusks called coquinas) and fish, resulting in ciguatera (fish poisoning) or paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). If lethal concentrations are ingested, death occurs within 12 hours as a result of respiratory and cardiac arrest. Aerosolized organisms along coastlines cause respiratory irritation resulting in coughing and worsening of asthma, and inflammation of the ocular, oral, and nasal mucous membranes, producing a burning sensation and tingling of lips and tongue. Saxitoxin, the paralytic shellfish toxin, and brevitoxin are some of the more common of the approximately 40 toxins produced and liberated by the dinoflagellate family.
Synonym(s): Gymnodium

Karenia brevis

(kă-ren′ē-ă brev′ĭs)
A marine dinoflagellate commonly found in red tides. It produces a toxin that can be irritating to the respiratory tract of animals when inhaled, or neurotoxic to humans when contaminated shellfish are eaten.
References in periodicals archive ?
The organisms include microalgae Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Karenia brevis selected on the basis of reports claiming their unusual toxic metal homeostasis, some shellfish crayfish Orconectes limosus, bivalve Corbicula fluminea known for uranium bioaccumulation, and a model organism zebrafish Danio reiro.
In Florida the outbreaks usually consist of clouds of a critter called Karenia brevis.
Effects of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis on larval development in three species of bivalve mollusc from Florida.
Although reports of marine k-tAbs which include blooms of the dinoflagellates Karenia brevis and Alexandrium spp.
Karen Melderis, a Sarasota resident since 1978, first noticed the effects of Florida's red tide in the 1990s when the symptoms from her asthma flared during blooms of Karenia brevis, the organism that causes red tide here.
9:00 MICROARRY ANALYSIS OF KARENIA BREVIS GENE EXPRESSION PATTERNS IN RESPONCE TO SALINITY DIFFERENCES
In the fall of 2007, Sosik and Olson collaborated with biological oceanographer Lisa Campbell at Texas A&M University to deploy the device in the Gulf of Mexico to look for seasonal blooms of toxic algae called Karenia brevis.
Florida red tides, an annual event in areas along the Gulf of Mexico, are blooms of the ocean organism, Karenia brevis (K brevis), that are concentrated along shorelines and produce highly potent aerosolized toxins.
Southwest Florida was in the throes of a red tide--in this case, a misnomer because the alga causing it, Karenia brevis, turns water yellow-green.
Karenia brevis is always in the water column in varying concentrations.
Comparative effects of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis on clearance rates in juveniles of four bivalve molluscs from Florida, USA.
Investigators conducting a decade-long study into how Florida's "red tide" algal blooms affect human health have discovered several compounds that counteract the toxins produced by the red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis.