kabbalah

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Related to Kabbalist: Kabbalah, kabbalism

kabbalah

Paranormal
A system of eclectic mysticism and healing based on ancient Jewish tradition involving angelology, demonology, meditation, prayers and ritual.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the Kabbalist risks his immortality with each linguistic transformation, Borges only entertains multiple variables whose basic purpose is to rejoice in the creative act that begins and ends with the the writing of fiction.
As he points out in the essay, Kabbalists hold that in generating all of creation, God revealed himself through language.
However, this is conclusion drawn by a late 13th century Catalan Kabbalist, R.
Torah scholar and biologist Sarah Yehudit Schneider reveals the surprisingly "feminist" ideas of the master kabbalist Rabbi Isaac Luria on how the feminine archetype develops in history.
Hanegraaff and Bouthoorn's edition surveys the biblical, alchemical, and kabbalist sources that shaped Lazzarelli's Crater Hermetis, as well as his other hermetic writings.
Spiritual collections will find the book/cd combination a popular read, using the skills of a kabbalist and storyteller to bring to life daily meditations on cd, from an Archangel mediation for courage to a Guardian Angel one for protection.
Tzvi had grandiose ideas of himself, but was generally regarded as an eccentric until 1665, when he met with Nathan of Gaza, a brilliant Kabbalist who became Shabbetai's prophet and publicist.
Kabbalah, Science And The Meaning of Life" by kabbalist and scientist Rav Michael Laitman deftly shares with his readers the hidden aspects of reality long known to students of the Judaic mysticism known as 'kabbalah' and only now beginning to emerge from western scientific inquiries.
From the perspective of the Kabbalist, Kabbalah is a .
Saiber provides a number of geometric illustrations from Bruno's works (the memory wheel from De umbris; and the combinatoric chart from Explicatio, to name a couple), which link Bruno to the Lullian and Kabbalist traditions, but, most importantly, reveal how the Nolan's inventive spirit aspired to an amplification of the various "means to obtaining knowledge and understanding (59).
Although Treitel draws attention to various links between Sigmund Freud's thought and occult psychology, no mention is made of David Bakan's seminal work on the possible Kabbalist roots of psychoanalysis.