kabbalah

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kabbalah

Paranormal
A system of eclectic mysticism and healing based on ancient Jewish tradition involving angelology, demonology, meditation, prayers and ritual.
References in periodicals archive ?
56) The quotation of Pietro Galatino (Chapter 11:3) is due, without any doubt, to the fact that Galatino was a Christian who had used the Kabbala for propaganda purposes.
Madonna has reportedly even talked to her Kabbala counsellor, Rabbi Yehuda Berg, about having a third child.
Their explanations of Kabbala, the Egyptian approach to time and immortality, as well as magic as medieval technological thinking are clear.
Bakan's treatment maintains Freud's psychoanalytic theory is rooted in Jewsih tradition - particularly the mysticism of the kabbala - and provides new interpretations based on this theory.
These are the matters that have proliferated on the Romantic edges of the Platonic heritage and at the institutional margins of Judeo-Christian religiosity (for example, Gnosticism, Hermeticism, Kabbala, Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry, Christian Theosophy, Mesmerism, Transcendentalism, and Spiritualism).
Al-Jazeera news editor Ayman Kabbala said: "No one has ever asked us this before, it is a strange request".
Gershom Sholem, one of the most distinguished scholars of the history of Kabbala and Jewish mysticism, tells us that the book of Zohar often presents evil as something real, or positive, not just as privation.
And more: Rabbi Isaac the Blind, the man considered the father of Kabbala (France, 1160-1235), wrote that all things, and all events are products of the letters of the Hebrew alphabet.
Given the preponderance of Jewish books in English on almost any subject, along with the steady stream of translations of rabbinics, kabbala, philosophy, and Jewish literature in all ages and periods, (11) there is little need to master the original texts in the first place, unless one professes to be a scholar.
Madge recalled her commitment to Jewish religion Kabbala and banned shoots, worried that the souls of dead birds would haunt her.
However, the alef in the first Hebrew word is reversed, and Spector argues that Alef means "the supernal man" in the Kabbala, and that the reversed alef reflects "materialism" resulting in "an inverted concept of God.