kin

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kin

(kĭn)
n.
1.
a. (used with a pl. verb) One's relatives or family: visited my aunt and her kin.
b. A relative or family member: Is she kin of yours?
2. (used with a pl. verb) Organisms that are genetically related to another or others: cauliflower and its kin.
adj.
Related genetically or in the same family.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kin Two has a more traditional landscape QWERTY slide form factor, an 8 megapixel camera and 8GB of storage.
Because of the emic distinctions between kin and non-kin, I modify Stack and Burton's terms 'kin-scripts' and 'kin-scriptions', and instead propose the terms 'care-scripts' and 'care-scription' to include the ways in which non-kin or Active kin become involved in the work of sustaining families, including providing eldercare.
The SQOL has been used in several previous studies that concerned healthy groups (student nurses, people looking for work), psychiatric outpatients, chronic psychiatric patients, patients with lesions after bacterial meningitis, patients with MS, patients with muscular dystrophies and their next of kin, and patients with low-grade glioma and their next of kin (Bostrom & Ahlstrom, 2005; Edvardsson & Ahlstrom, 2009; Eklund, 1996, 1999; Hugosson et al., 1997; Isaksson, Ahlstrom, & Gunnarsson, 2005; Kajandi, 2006).
Salz also points out that the KIN phones and C3 aren't the first phones to go down the social path: London-based mobile manufacturer INQ brought its own social mobile phone to market more than a year before Microsoft and Nokia.
The second major condition, "chaotic home," played a role in the development of kin and fictive kin relationships.
Jarrett & Burton (1999) confirmed the use of extended kin networks among low-income African American households in the late 1980s.
Patriarchal relational rights and responsibilities meant that their relationships to society, economy, politics and religion were always mediated, most particularly through kin or idiomatic kin, and not direct.
In this paper I show that subsistence survival in the twenty-first century for rural Viliui Sakha is based on household-level cultural ecology, focusing on keeping cows and exchanging labor and products with kin (Crate, 2001).
A definition of kin relations is a much-needed theoretical construct in discussing family business.
Summarizing findings from a forthcoming book, this policy brief examines when and how child welfare agencies rely on kin to care for children who are taken into state custody.
Earlier studies had only demonstrated kin recognition that leads to preferential treatment, Mateo says.