keratocystic odontogenic tumour

(redirected from KCOT)
Also found in: Acronyms.

keratocystic odontogenic tumour

A benign cystic lesion of the jaw—75% in mandible, 90% behind canines—which arises in the dental lamina, often associated with impacted teeth; average age, 41 years; male:female ratio, 2:1. If multiple tumours are seen, basal cell nevus syndrome (a condition accompanied by basal cell carcinoma, ovarian fibroma, palmar pits, and medulloblastoma) should be excluded.

Management
KCOTs notoriously recur; initial surgery should include a generous margin and a rim of uninvolved bone.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The purpose of this paper is to highlight the importance of the neutral zone for a mandibular partial denture in the rehabilitation of partial mandibulectomy of KCOT. This ensures that the polished surface of the denture does not encroach the functional movement on the lingual and buccal musculature and eventually minimizes denture displacement.
The multilocular KCOT was not included in the study because this type of lesion is not suitable for operation using endoscopy.
A final diagnosis of an infected KCOT was made and a month later the lesion was enucleated in toto under general anesthesia followed by chemical cauterization by of the cystic cavity with Carnoy's solution.
In the present study, therefore, we detected the expression of YAP/TAZ, Cyr61, CTGF, Ki-67, YAP, and TAZ in clinical samples of KCOT and OM using immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence staining, and western blot analysis, respectively.
In 2005, World Health Organization (WHO) classified these lesions as keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT) assuming that this classification would better reflect the neoplastic nature of these lesions.
On the other hand KCOT showed contrary results as none of epithelial lining expressed positive staining for Calretinin, (pless than 0.001).
Accounting for up to 10% of developmental cysts and showing a slight male predilection, KCOT usually presents in young patients (10 to 40 years), although patients with a syndrome-associated tumor present at an even younger age.
KCOT typically occurs in the 2nd to 3rd decades of life with a slight male predilection [6].
A retrospective study of 116 cases of PIOSCC between 1938 and 2010 showed that there have been only 16 known cases of PIOSCC arising from KCOT [44].
Patient information included gender, age, ethnic group and, in KCOT cases, association with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), also known as Gorlin syndrome.
Lesions include lateral periodontal cyst, collateral KCOT, CGCG, fibro osseous lesions, ameloblastoma, osteomas, etc.
The new World Health Organization classification for head and neck tumors has designated OKC as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) and reclassified it as a neoplasm in view of its intrinsic growth potential and propensity to recur.