K-Dur


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K-Dur

(kā′dûr′)
A trademark for an oral preparation of extended-release potassium chloride.
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References in periodicals archive ?
2) In In re K-Dur Antitrust Litigation, (3) the Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit considered whether reverse-payment agreements between Schering-Plough Corporation (Schering) and its generic competitors Upsher-Smith Laboratories (Upsher) and ESI Lederle (ESI) amounted to an unreasonable restraint on trade.
By keeping generic versions of K-Dur off the market, the settlement kept prices high for employers, health insurers, drugstores and consumers, according to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
To settle civil False Claims Act liabilities, Schering-Plough will pay $255 million for misreporting its best price of Claritin RediTabs and K-Dur to avoid paying Medicaid rebates (thereby overcharging Public Health Service programs); paying physicians to prescribe Intron A and Temodar; and promoting Temodar for certain brain tumors and brain metastases and Intron A for superficial bladder cancer--off-label uses not approved by the FDA.
The July 2012 decision of the Third Circuit involves the drug K-dur from Schering Plough Corp.
Upshur-Smith agreed not to compete with K-Dur 20 until September 2001, after which Schering would license the product to Upshur-Smith -- avoiding a lawsuit which might have invalidated the patent and opened the market to other generic competitors.
district courts involve the following namebrand drugs: Cardizen CD (diltiazem hydrochloride), Cipro (ciprofloxacin hydrochloride), Hytrin (terazosin hydrochloride), K-Dur 20 (potassium chloride), and Nolvadex (tamoxifen citrate).
American Home Products") (NYSE:AHP), on behalf of a nationwide class of end-users who, since June 17, 1997, have purchased K-Dur 20, a brand-name drug prescribed by doctors for patients with certain heart troubles.
and generics companies that delayed competing versions of K-Dur 20, a potassium supplement.
The FTC administrative complaint alleges that Schering, the maker of K-Dur 20, a widely prescribed potassium chloride supplement, illegally paid Upsher-Smith and American Home Products millions of dollars to induce them to delay launching their generic versions of the drug.
American Home Products"), on behalf of a Class consisting of all Florida residents who, since June 17, 1997, have purchased K-Dur 20, a prescription brand-name potassium chloride supplement frequently taken by consumers on heart medication.
to keep the latter's version of K-Dur 20 (Schering-Plough's potassium chloride supplement) off the market until 2001.
AHP, which is now Wyeth) entered into illegal agreements in 1997 and 1998 that resulted in a delay of the entry of generics competition for Schering's K-Dur 20, a drug used to treat patients with low potassium.