neoteny

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neoteny

 [ne-ot´ĕ-ne]
prolongation of the larval form in a sexually mature organism. adj., adj neoten´ic.

ne·ot·e·ny

(nē-ot'ĕ-nē),
Prolongation of the larval state, as in the Mexican tiger salamander or axolotl, or in certain termite castes held in the larval stage as future replacements of the queen. Compare: pedogenesis.
[neo- + G. teinō, to stretch]

neoteny

(nē-ŏt′n-ē)
n.
1. The retention of juvenile characteristics in the adults of a species, as among certain amphibians. Also called pedomorphism, pedomorphosis.
2. The attainment of sexual maturity and subsequent reproduction by an organism still in its larval stage. Also called pedogenesis2.

ne′o·ten′ic (nē′ə-tĕn′ĭk, -tē′nĭk), ne·ot′e·nous (-ŏt′n-əs) adj.

neoteny

[nē·ot′ənē]
Etymology: Gk, neos, new, teinein, to stretch
the attainment of sexual maturity during the larval stage of development, such as in certain amphibians, especially salamanders.

neoteny

see PAEDOGENESIS.

neoteny

prolongation of the larval form in a sexually mature organism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Still, for Bergler, juvenilization has not been all bad.
What Thomas Bergler calls the juvenilization of American Christianity has allowed some teenagers and young adults to embrace their faith more fully at a deeper emotional level.
The Fossil girls have more career options than their Whichart counterparts, partly because of their superior talents--Daisy's "very real gifts as a dancer" (Whicharts 63) cannot compare with what Ellen Lewis Buell calls Posy's "unselfconscious genius" (10)--but primarily because of a class upgrade between The Whicharts and its juvenilization.
In addition to the erasure of social issues related to sexuality, a significant chronological shift occurs between the adult novel and its juvenilization.
Heterochronic increases in the rate of somatic development cannot produce juvenilization in descendent ontogenies.
For the role of altenative family in the latter, see Thomas Doherty, Teenagers and Teenpics: The Juvenilization of American Movies in the 1950s (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2002), 85.
Indeed, more than a decade has now passed since the publication of Jon Lewis' The Road to Romance and Ruin: Teen Films and Youth Culture and Thomas Doherty's Teenagers and Teenpics: The Juvenilization of American Movies in the 1950s, (3) books which, contrary to expectations, have not yet launched a noticeable proliferation of volumes on teen films.
3) Jon Lewis, The Road to Romance and Ruin: Teen Films and Youth Culture, Routledge, New York and London, 1992; Thomas Doherty, Teenagers and Teenpics: The Juvenilization of American Movies in the 1950s, Boston, Unwin Hyman, 1998.