justice

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justice

 [jus´tis]
a principle of bioethics that means giving others what is due to them; it is comprised of a group of norms for the fair distribution of benefits, risks, and costs. The terms fairness, desert, and entitlement have been used by philosophers to explicate the idea of justice, while equitability and appropriateness of treatment are used in interpretations. A situation involving justice is present whenever persons are due to receive benefits or burdens because of their particular circumstances. Justice may be distributive, criminal or punitive, or rectificatory.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis),
The ethical principle that persons who have similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; sometimes known as distributive justice.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice

Etymology: L, justus, sufficient
1 a principle of fair and equal treatment for all, with due reward and honor.
2 (in research) equitable distribution of benefits and burdens of research.
3 treating people in a nonprejudicial manner.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing Ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; fairness with equal distribution of goods and services.
See also: Nursing Interventions Classification
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice,

n principle of medical ethics according to which a person treats another person with fairness in both medical and nonmedical settings.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice,

n the constant and perpetual disposition to render every person his or her due. Also, the conformity of one's actions and will to the law.
References in periodicals archive ?
The full data-point expansion applies only to the last three Chief Justiceships, and is under way for the Laskin Court.
While, in Epstein's view, the Court did take some positive steps during the Chief Justiceship of William H.
Rather, most of my professional work since leaving the Chief Justiceship has been in what I jocularly call "playing judge.
T]hose of us who know how the luster of his great Chief Justiceship came to be eclipsed by Dred Scott cannot help believing that he had that case--its already apparent consequences for the court, and its soon-to-be-played-out consequences for the Nation--burning on his mind.
htm (reviewing Broderick's dramatic career, ranging from his participation in former President Clinton's 1992 campaign, to an investigation into his alleged involvement in judicial misconduct, to a bizarre in-home attack that left him unrecognizable); Justices Criticized for E-mail on Ballot Issue, supra note 25 (reporting the controversy that erupted as a result of the court speaking out against a proposed constitutional amendment); Ramer, supra note 3 (reporting that the statute under which Broderick succeeded to his chief justiceship was ruled unconstitutional).
However, '[i]n such a short period, it was not possible for him to place a distinctive mark on the Chief Justiceship.
One distinctive feature of the new chief justiceship suggests the possibility of a different pattern from that of the Lamer Court.
Jackson later made an open attack on his Alabama colleague, Hugo Black, in 1946, at a time when Jackson might well have been boosted to the chief justiceship.
When Marshall assumed the Chief Justiceship, the Supreme Court was, at best, an inchoate institution, a co-equal branch in theory but a poor relation in fact.
MALTZ, THE CHIEF JUSTICESHIP OF WARREN BURGER, 1969-1986 42 (2000) ("[I]t was widely feared that President Nixon was prepared to resist anything less than a unanimous decision from the court.
Rutledge, `Edward Butler and the Chief Justiceship,' Historical Studies, No.
Johnson, The Chief Justiceship of John Marshall, 1801-1835.