justice

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justice

 [jus´tis]
a principle of bioethics that means giving others what is due to them; it is comprised of a group of norms for the fair distribution of benefits, risks, and costs. The terms fairness, desert, and entitlement have been used by philosophers to explicate the idea of justice, while equitability and appropriateness of treatment are used in interpretations. A situation involving justice is present whenever persons are due to receive benefits or burdens because of their particular circumstances. Justice may be distributive, criminal or punitive, or rectificatory.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis),
The ethical principle that persons who have similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; sometimes known as distributive justice.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice

Etymology: L, justus, sufficient
1 a principle of fair and equal treatment for all, with due reward and honor.
2 (in research) equitable distribution of benefits and burdens of research.
3 treating people in a nonprejudicial manner.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing Ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; fairness with equal distribution of goods and services.
See also: Nursing Interventions Classification
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice,

n principle of medical ethics according to which a person treats another person with fairness in both medical and nonmedical settings.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

justice,

n the constant and perpetual disposition to render every person his or her due. Also, the conformity of one's actions and will to the law.
References in periodicals archive ?
110) These cases do not seem to have any centre of gravity: they are scattered across the three Chief Justiceships (four for Dickson, seven for Lamer, four for McLachlin) and across the four areas of law indicated above.
Although less sweeping than Powe's The Warren Court and American Politics, the best-one volume study of the Burger Court is Earl Maltz's The Chief Justiceship of Warren Burger.
Using this definition, Smith highlights several nominations, each to fill the chief justiceship, as exemplifying this notion.
The Supreme Court in the Early Republic: The Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth.
If one were asked to provide a full account of Supreme Court appellate review of state criminal prosecutions from the beginning of the Supreme Court's existence all the way through the Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth, and halfway through John Marshall's, only three words would be needed: There was none.
31) McCormick found that during the last three Chief Justiceships (1984-2011), an initial minority became a majority some 255 times, or roughly one in every four divided panels.
Professor Casto is the author of The Supreme Court in the Early Republic: The Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth (Univ.
These included justiceships with the Troy Police Court, Rensselaer Family Court in 1985, New York State Supreme Court in 1991, and an appointment as an administrative judge for the Third Judicial District in 1994.
Chief justiceships of the United States Supreme Court
55) It had provided an effective root-and-branch argument in 1641, for to take away all of the bishops' "secular" powers entailed not simply the forbidding them civil offices such as seats in Parliament and justiceships of the peace but also the removal of those coercive powers and physical punishments that they had wielded as part of their ostensibly "spiritual" functions.
Casto, The Supreme Court in the Early Republic: The Chief Justiceships of John Jay and Oliver Ellsworth 222-38 (1995) (detailing the methods of constitutional interpretation employed by the early Court).