jumping gene

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jump·ing gene

a gene associated with transposable elements. See: transposon.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

jumping gene

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

jumping gene

a TRANSPOSABLE GENETIC ELEMENT, a term that has been used because of the ability of such elements to move about and insert at various sites in the GENOME.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers studied jumping genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster--a classic model to study jumping genes in developing sperm and egg cells.
Animals unwittingly developed a powerful system to suppress jumping gene activity that uses small, non-coding RNAs called piRNAs, which recognize jumping genes and suppress their activity.
Because repression of a jumping gene also affects genes located near it on the chromosome, the researchers suspect that these repressors have been co-opted for other gene-regulatory functions, and that those other functions have persisted and evolved long after the jumping genes the repressors originally turned off have degraded due to the accumulation of random mutations.
These jumping genes are actually small pieces of DNA that can copy themselves throughout a genome and are known as transposable elements.
'Jumping genes' is a rather interesting name given to certain genetic elements, mobile pieces of DNA sequences that are present in the genomes of almost all living things.
"These are also known as 'jumping genes' because they are pieces of DNA that can move around within a genome."
The effect of jumping genes could be likened to cutting a small section from a tape recording of a Beethoven symphony and re-splicing it into the tape elsewhere, usually with a disruptive effect.
Washington, June 21 ( ANI ): A team of researchers, led by academics at The University of Nottingham, have explained why the so-called "jumping genes" found in most living organisms don't ultimately kill off their hosts, putting an end to a long-standing scientific mystery.
Researchers exposed translucent zebrafish to transposons, "jumping genes" that move around inside the genome of a cell.
When the Wimbledon handler is coupled with the 'jumping genes' of this dynasty, they clearly make a formidable force!
Today, one of the most important biotech tools Baker and co-researchers have at their command is jumping genes. These nimble pieces of genetic material are also known as transposons.
Washington, May 8 ( ANI ): Modern-day orangutans are host to ancient jumping genes dubbed Alu, which are over 16 million years old, according to a new study.