jump

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jump

The displacement of the image of an object occurring when viewing across the borderline between two portions of different power in a bifocal or trifocal lens. The jump is eliminated by placing the optical centres on the dividing line; the lens is then called a no jump bifocal (e.g. a monocentric bifocal with a straight dividing line) (Fig. J1). Syn. image jump; prismatic jump. See monocentric.
Fig. J1 Image jump upward caused by the segment of a bifocal lens, as the direction of gaze is lowered across the dividing lineenlarge picture
Fig. J1 Image jump upward caused by the segment of a bifocal lens, as the direction of gaze is lowered across the dividing line
References in periodicals archive ?
BEIRUT: Hizbullah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah warned Thursday against attempts to instigate sectarian strife, urging Lebanese not to jump to conclusions before investigations into security incidents are concluded.
The author asserts that human performance improvement focuses on accomplishments, finds the root cause of performance gaps, and does not jump to conclusions.
Perhaps the misleading table in the article should be revised so that busy medical doctors don't jump to conclusions, and hedgehogs don't end up on the euthanasia list at shelters.
"It's clear the state is being tough, but it's not its role to jump to conclusions." The UOIF denied it was anti-Jewish.
Von Saldern is careful to not let her readers jump to conclusions, though.
"The idea is not to be so quick to jump to conclusions without a thorough process."
"You always have to explain yourself because people jump to conclusions about what you mean, or what you said, or your tone," says Erma, 49, of Los Angeles.
Finally, don't jump to conclusions about doctors' motives.
One of the main reasons we jump to conclusions or have misunderstandings is that we tend to have impulsive, trigger-like reactions.
There can be a considerable incubation time before the effects of a change are noticeable, so it's important not to jump to conclusions. It's also important to start a timeline far enough back, even several months before the problem appeared.
He strenuously avoids instructing with "an Oliver Stone-like moral point of view." And he allows for this to happen, starting with the opening scene, which sets up the style of the whole movie in a seven-and-a-half-minute take that is a slow sucker shot for viewers who want to jump to conclusions, only to realize that they have jumped too soon.
Do you fake attention, allow distractions, daydream or jump to conclusions and tune-out?