locus of control

(redirected from Julian Rotter)

locus

 [lo´kus] (L.)
1. a place or site.
2. in genetics, the specific site of a gene on a chromosome.
locus ceru´leus a pigmented eminence in the superior angle of the floor of the fourth ventricle of the brain.
locus of control a belief regarding responsibility for actions. Individuals with an internal locus of control generally hold themselves responsible for actions and consequences, while those with an external locus of control tend to believe that they are not able to affect a personal outcome and that luck or destiny are responsible for their actions.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

lo·cus of con·trol

a theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over his/her own behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lo·cus of con·trol

(lō'kŭs kŏn-trōl')
1. A theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over personal behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.
2. biowarfare A place from which a terrorist event is evaluated and managed.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

lo·cus of con·trol

(lō'kŭs kŏn-trōl')
A theoretic construct designed to assess a person's perceived control over personal behavior; classified as internal if the person feels in control of events, external if others are perceived to have that control.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
Description: Julian Rotter's social learning theory defines the causality of behavior (including related attitudes and emotions) as a function of individual expectancy for a valued reward, plus situational factors and circumstances operating within the related environment.
Walter Mischel received his doctorate working under George Kelly and Julian Rotter at Ohio State University, before establishing his professional career at Colorado, Harvard, and Stanford Universities.
Julian Rotter assumed that man was an active participant in the events in his life.
Julian Rotter, a professor of psychology at the University of Connecticut, developed the concept of what he calls "locus of control." Some people, he says, view themselves as essentially in control of the good and bad things they experience - i.e., they have an internal locus of control.
El dia lunes 5 de enero del 2014, el psicologo estadounidense Julian Rotter fallecio a los 97 anos de edad.
Julian Rotter, progenitor of one model of social learning theory.(2),(3) believed that behavior is a function of a person's expectation for a reward of sufficient (and motivating) value, plus intervening situational and related psychological factors.
Research tools, Locus of control by Julian Rotter (1966) and Stress questionnaire by International Stress Management Association UK (2009) were used for data collection.
Julian Rotter's classic work on perceived "locus of control" provides a good example.
Chapters include: the psychoanalytic legacy--Sigmund Freud; personality's ancestral foundation--Carl Jung; overcoming inferiority and striving for superiority--Alfred Adler; moving toward, away from, and against others--Karen Horney; personality from the interpersonal perspective--Harry Stack Sullivan; the seasons of our lives--Erik Erikson; the sociopsychological approach to personality--Erich Fromm; every person is to be prized--Carl Rogers; becoming all that one can be--Abraham Maslow; marching to a different drummer--George Kelly; the social-cognitive approach to personality--Walter Mischel and Julian Rotter; thinking ahead and learning mastery of one's circumstances--Albert Bandura; it's all a matter of consequences--B.F.
Julian Rotter's (1966) conception of locus of control distinguishes two types of individuals, internals, who perceive the likelihood of an event occurring as a product of their own behavior, and externals, who view events as contingent on luck, chance, or other people.
Chapters include: the psychoanalytic legacy--Sigmund Freud; personality's ancestral foundation--Carl Jung; overcoming inferiority and striving for superiority--Alfred Adler; moving toward, away from, and against others--Karen Horney; personality from the interpersonal perspective--Harry Stack Sullivan; the seasons of our lives--Erick Erikson; the sociopsychological approach to personality--Erich Fromm; every person is to be prized--Carl Rogers; becoming all that one can be--Abraham Maslow; marching to a different drummer--George Kelly; the social-cognitive approach to personality--Walter Mischel and Julian Rotter; thinking ahead and learning mastery of one's circumstances--Albert Bandura; it's all a matter of consequences--B.