jugular veins


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Related to jugular veins: internal jugular vein, axillary vein, subclavian vein, vena jugularis, Carotid arteries

jugular

 [jug´u-lar]
1. cervical (def. 1).
2. pertaining to a jugular vein.
3. a jugular vein.
jugular veins large veins that return blood to the heart from the head and neck; each side of the neck has two jugular veins, external and internal. The external jugular carries blood from the face, neck, and scalp and has two branches, posterior and anterior. The internal jugular vein receives blood from the brain, the deeper tissues of the neck and the interior of the skull. The external jugular vein empties into the subclavian vein, and the internal jugular vein joins it to form the brachiocephalic vein, which carries the blood to the superior vena cava, where it continues to the heart. If one of these veins is severed, rapid loss of blood will result and air may enter the circulatory system. In such a case, a compress should be applied to the wound with pressure. See anatomic Table of Veins in the Appendices and see color plates.
Location of the internal and external jugular veins. From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.

an·te·ri·or jug·u·lar vein

[TA]
vein that arises below the chin from veins draining the lower lip and mental region, descends in the anterior portion of the neck, coursing either superficial or deep to the investing cervical fascia to terminate in the external jugular vein at the lateral border of the scalenus anterior muscle.
Synonym(s): vena jugularis anterior [TA]

jugular veins

The six main veins-the right and left internal and external jugulars and the front anterior jugulars-that run down the front and side of the neck, carrying blood back to the heart from the head. The internal jugulars are very large trunks containing blood at low pressure. The external and anterior jugulars are much smaller.

jugular

1. pertaining to the neck.
2. one of the jugular veins.

jugular furrow
the groove on each side of the neck in which the jugular vein can be located. Lies dorsal to the trachea.
jugular inlet
the depression at the base of the neck where the jugular vein passes medial to the first rib. Examination of the inlet is valuable because it is possible to determine the activity and efficiency of the right atrium and the patency of the jugular vein by observing the movements of the vein's wall.
jugular vein distention
see jugular vein engorgement (below).
Enlarge picture
External jugular vein in the dog. By permission from McCurnin D, Poffenbarger EM, Small Animal Physical Diagnosis and Clinical Procedures, Saunders, 1991
jugular vein engorgement
is a clinical indicator of obstruction to the return of blood to the right atrium, e.g. because of congestive heart failure or space-occupying lesion in the anterior thorax.
jugular veins
two pairs of large veins, internal and external, that return blood to the heart from the head and neck.
References in periodicals archive ?
External jugular vein aneurysm: A source of thrombotic complications.
Duplication of internal jugular vein and relation to the spinal accessory nerve.
The effects of the simulated Valsalva maneuver, liver compression, and/or Trendelenburg position on the cross-sectional area of the internal jugular vein in infants and young children.
Table 2 Cross-sectional area of right internal jugular vein before and after skin traction ([cm.
The skin-traction method increases the cross-sectional area of the internal jugular vein by increasing its anteroposterior diameter.
The external jugular vein began at the angle of the mandible as the continuation of posterior division of retromandibular and passed at first superficial to the sternocleidomastoid muscle, then deep to the muscle and drained into the internal jugular vein above the midpoint of the line joining the angle of the mandible to the middle of the clavicle.
Facial vein draining into external jugular vein in humans: its variations, phylogenetic retention and clinical relevance.
On the basis of the results of the cardiovascular ultrasound screening exam, 1% of study participants were diagnosed as having abdominal aortic aneurysm, 16% had anomalous internal jugular veins, and 49% had significant carotid atherosclerosis.
Thrombosis of both internal jugular veins extended through the subclavian system and into both upper extremities.
Radiographic evaluation of the neck and internal jugular veins can be accomplished in several ways: via venous duplex ultrasonography, CT with IV contrast (in patients with adequate renal function), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance venography, nuclear scintigraphy, and gallium-67 scanning.
The internal jugular vein (IJV) is a delicate vessel that is well protected by deep fascia.
Anatomic relationship between the spinal accessory nerve and internal jugular vein in the upper neck.