judgment

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judgment

 [juj´ment]
the ability to make logical, rational decisions and decide whether a given action is right or wrong.
clinical judgment the process by which the nurse decides on data to be collected about a client, makes an interpretation of the data, arrives at a nursing diagnosis, and identifies appropriate nursing actions; this involves problem solving, decision making, and critical thinking.

judgment

[juj′mənt]
Etymology: L, judicare, to judge
1 (in law) the final decision of the court regarding the case before it.
2 the reason given by the court for its decision; an opinion.
3 an award, penalty, or other sentence of law given by the court.
4 the ability to recognize the relationships of ideas and to form correct conclusions from those data as well as from those acquired from experience.

judg·ment

(jŭj'mĕnt)
Ability to evaluate the positive and negative aspects of a behavior or situation and act or react appropriately.
Compare: discrimination
Synonym(s): judgement.

judg·ment

(jŭj'mĕnt)
Ability to evaluate aspects of a behavior or situation and act or react appropriately.
Synonym(s): judgement.

judgment,

n 1. a legal finding.
n 2. the ability to discriminate between or among two or more states or conditions.
References in classic literature ?
What do you mean by speaking of the Judgment Day in the past tense?
I hope I'll be dead the next time the Judgment Day comes.
If, from your favourable judgment, I have conceived some esteem for them, it cannot be imputed to vanity; since I should have agreed as implicitly to your opinion, had it been given in favour of any other man's production.
There is no assignment of Judgments filed in the case of purchased agreements
1) Since the earliest days of the republic, judicial bodies have entertained actions to enforce judgments that were rendered in different states.
According to Bandura, self-efficacy refers to personal judgments of one's capabilities to perform tasks at designated levels.
21, the high court restored an earlier British Columbia Supreme Court ruling that said the federal government should bear 75 per cent of the cost of any judgments awarded to plaintiffs who attended the schools and the churches should pay 25 per cent.
The number of county court judgments being made against people is rising at its fastest rate since 1991.
Presently there is a Florida statute that limits judgment liens to 20 years, (3) and there is a Florida statute that limits "actions" on certain judgments to 20 years and other judgments to five years.
It is traditional that British and Canadian appeal courts render many judgments orally, in open court.