impact factor

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impact factor

mathematical expression of frequency with which a given medical journal's original articles are cited in other medical journals.

im·pact fac·tor

(im'pakt fak'tŏr)
Mathematic expression of frequency with which a particular medical journal's original articles are cited in other medical journals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bradford's law, the long tail principle, and transparency in Journal Impact Factor calculations.
Journal impact factor, a proxy for journal importance reflecting the number of citations of recent articles, was also recorded and included in the analysis.
In contrast to the official journal impact factor, CiteScore recognizes all articles as potentially citable, including editorials and letters to the editor, which are usually cited less often.
Despite misuse and abuse, Journal Impact Factor will retain its impact and won't fade away soon.
The Journal Impact Factor, again pioneered by Garfield, has long been used to measure the importance of scholarly journals, although it now has some competitors.
Originally devised in 1955 [1] and first published in its current form in 1972 by Thomson Reuters's Web of Science, the journal impact factor (JIF) was primarily designed to help librarians decide on journal subscriptions but later evolved into an indicator of journal prestige and quality [2].
It is worth mentioning that the RG users express reservations about its unclear and ambiguous features such as the journal impact factor, researchers' impact points and the RG score.
First, articles are evaluated by the journal in which they are published, as is the case when using the journal impact factor.
For example, they might calculate their journal impact factor using Google Scholar citation.
Academic appropriations are mainly measured by using citation indicators (cites per document, citation sources, citations related to knowledge area, citations across time)--these have been traditionally expressed as Journal Impact Factor (JIF) or Scimago Journal Rank (SJR).
A glossary defines ninety terms used in the book, such as crowdsourcing, the Deep Web, digital forensics, journal impact factor, selection bias, and snowball effect.
For academic authors, the post-publication activity around their scholarly article - such as being included in a ScienceOpen Collection and the visibility associated with that, may bring more reputation to their work than the so-called journal impact factor.
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