Priestley, Joseph

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Priestley, Joseph

(1733–1804) English chemist who discovered oxygen, and observed that carbon dioxide (fixed air) was produced in FERMENTATION and that oxygen is produced by green plants in sunlight.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hodson, Jane 2008 "Joseph Priestley's two Rudiments of English Grammar: 1761 and 1768", in: Ingrid Tieken-Boon van Ostade (ed.), 177-189.
Science and worldviews in the classroom: Joseph Priestley and photosynthesis.
Joseph Priestley's contributions to the religious, scientific, political, and intellectual communities were so vast, contend the editors of this volume, that no one author can do them justice.
"Although it centers on the life of Joseph Priestley, the 18th century English chemist and clergyman, [The Invention of Air] is far from a conventional biography.
Steven Johnson - The author talks about his new book, "The Invention of Air," about Joseph Priestley, an 18th century scientist and theologian who played a role in the invention of ecosystem science and the founding of the Unitarian Church, 7:30 p.m., Powell's City of Books, 1005 W.
What name did scientist Joseph Priestley give to the gas which was later called oxygen when he was conducting experiments in 1774?
"Estabamos unidos por un amor comun a la ciencia", escribio uno de sus miembros, Joseph Priestley, predicador y quimico, el descubridor del "aire inflamable": nuestro oxigeno.
Other essays touch on significant personalities: Richard Price, William Page Roberts, Joseph Priestley, Lesslie Newbigin, Olive Wyon, C.
Oxygen was discovered by the combined but independent work of two rivals: Joseph Priestley, a self-taught scientist from England, and Antoine Lavoisier, an aristocratic French tax collector and science theorist.
Klemp, 'John Manningham's Diary and a Lost Whit-Sunday Sermon by Lancelot Andrewes'; David Chandler, 'A Bibliographical History of Thomas Howes' Critical Observations (1776-1807) and his Dispute with Joseph Priestley'; and Andrew M.
Although I don't think I realized it at the time, our experiment was very similar to the one Joseph Priestley performed in 1774 that led to the discovery of oxygen.
The book's subtitle refers to "Five Friends" (Matthew Boulton, Erasmus Darwin, Joseph Priestley, James Watt, and Josiah Wedgewood), but the "Lunar Men" (so-called as they met at each full moon) studied includes seven others, several of whom were younger than the five upon whom the author concentrates.