Addison

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Ad·di·son

(ad'i-sŏn),

Ad·di·son

(ad'i-sŏn),
Christopher, English anatomist, 1869-1951. See: Addison clinical planes.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the Restoration dramatists - George Farquhar - lived in Shrewsbury, and the foremost essayist of the era, Joseph Addison, came from Lichfield.
The TLS had been concerned from the beginning with establishing itself as a guide for what the common reader should read, a project that has its roots in the criticism of Joseph Addison and Samuel Johnson.
In a 1711 issue of the Spectator, Joseph Addison condemned the "loose Tribe of Men .
Biography was enlisted in explanation: In 1862, Harris, an illegitimate child who never knew his father, went to work as a boy of fifteen in the printshop of Joseph Addison Turner's Turnwold plantation, near his home town of Eatonton in Putnam County, Georgia.
The most famous of its owners was the 18th century poet, essayist and politician, Joseph Addison, and a previous occupant was playwright Edward De Vere, who some believe to be the true author of many of Shakespeare's plays.
I was encouraged to believe Joseph Addison when he wrote, "What sunshine is to flowers, smiles are to humanity.
The piece is another exercise in massed orchestral sonorities (a genre currently popular with a number of today's composers), springing from a poem by Joseph Addison.
Woodes Rogers sought the help of Richard Steele (partner of Joseph Addison in the publication of the Tatler).
With his friend and collaborator, Joseph Addison, Sir Richard Steele began magazine writing in London.
He does so through careful examination of critical pronouncements by such figures as John Dennis, Joseph Addison, and Richard Blackmore, who attempted to articulate rationales for a language of feeling that supplies Irlam's strongest unifying concept, as he investigates its justification and its instantiation in the poetry of Young and Thomson.
The Whig Joseph Addison, on the other hand, in the Spectator (1711-12), takes Quixotic madness as a model for revaluing the imagination that Swift treats as transgressive, and transforms Swiftian satiric ridicule into pure comedy, based on an aesthetics of pleasurable response or sympathetic laughter, an area which he designated as the Novel, New, or Uncommon.
I have often thought," wrote Joseph Addison in The Tatler, "it happens very well that Christmas should fall out in the middle of winter.