Howell-Jolly bodies

(redirected from Jolly bodies)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

How·ell-Jol·ly bod·ies

(how'ĕl zhō-lē'),
spheric or ovoid eccentrically located granules, approximately 1 mcm in diameter, occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes, especially in stained preparations (as compared with wet unstained films); probably represent nuclear remnants, staining with dyes that are rather specific for chromatin; the significance of the bodies is not exactly known; they occur most frequently after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia.
Synonym(s): Jolly bodies

How·ell-Jol·ly bo·dies

(how'ĕl zhō-lē' bod'ēz)
Spheric or ovoid eccentrically located granules, approximately 1 mcm in diameter, occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia.

Howell,

William, U.S. physiologist, 1860-1945.
Howell-Jolly bodies - spherical or ovoid eccentrically located granules occasionally observed in the stroma of circulating erythrocytes that occur most frequently after splenectomy or in megaloblastic or severe hemolytic anemia. Synonym(s): Jolly bodies
Howell unit - equivalent approximately to 0.002 mg of pure heparin. Synonym(s): heparin unit

Jolly,

Justin, French histologist, 1870-1953.
Howell-Jolly bodies - see under Howell
Jolly bodies - Synonym(s): Howell-Jolly bodies
References in periodicals archive ?
The causes of thrombocytosis could be multiple such as myeloproliferative disorders, reactive or secondary thrombocytosis or Hyposplenism or Post splenectomy.2 Hyposplenism (or asplenia or autosplenectomy) is defined as underfunctioning of the spleen which may or not be associated with a reduction in splenic size.3 The normal functions of the spleen are reduced to a varying degree in a number of illnesses including systemic lupus.3 Hyposplenism is characterized clinically by leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, presence of Howell jolly bodies, erythrocytes pits and acanthocytes on peripheral smear.
The differential diagnosis included other red cell inclusions such as Pappenheimer bodies and Howell Jolly bodies.
The inclusions were morphologically distinct from both Pappenheimer bodies (Figure 5) and Howell Jolly bodies (Figure 6), being finer in appearance, spread throughout the cell, and exclusively found within the polychromatic cells.