Joint Future Agenda

Joint Future Agenda

A Bill (Community Care and Health Bill 2001) introduced in Scottish Parliament, which provided measures to enable greater joint working between the NHS and local authorities to deliver a range of health and social care services. The Joint Future Agenda aimed to remove obstacles to joint service delivery by creating pooled budgets, delegating functions to one another (e.g., allowing one of the partner bodies to provide all mental health or learning disability services locally, avoiding two or more agencies providing similar services for the same group of people) and widening the scope for financial transactions between the NHS and local authorities.

Joint Future Agenda, key components
Balance of care
Better assessment of whether an individual needs residential care or whether additional domiciliary services would enable him or her to remain at home.

Single shared assessment
One member of a multi-agency team, drawing on other professionals as appropriate, should carry out an assessment. All agencies involved in a particular project should agree as to who carries out the assessment and accept the outcome, including the budgetary implications.

Information sharing
The Joint Future Group expects information sharing across all agencies, leading to information systems integration while ensuring compliance with any relevant legislation—e.g., the Data Protection Act 1998.

Equipment and adaptations rehabilitations services
Agencies are to jointly resource and manage equipment and adaptations services with combined storage facilities, impacting on occupational therapists, whose input is central to managing intensive care services.

Intensive care management
A service for people with complex or frequently changing needs. Staff from different agencies must be trained up to function in multidisciplinary, multi-agency teams.

Joint resourcing and joint management
Every area/community care service/individual care user group is expected to introduce joint resourcing and joint management of services for older people. Resources at agencies' disposal include staff, buildings, money and equipment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book has three main objectives: to make sense of the debates surrounding the nature of partnership working; to examine the extent to which there is an evidence base to support partnership working; and to explore the emergence of the Joint Future Agenda in Scotland.
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