Jex-Blake

Jex-Blake

(jĕks′blāk′), Sophia 1840-1912.
British physician. After successfully lobbying for legislation permitting women to practice medicine (1876), she became the first licensed woman physician in Great Britain (1877).
References in periodicals archive ?
One was to Sophia Jex-Blake, who was the first woman to study medicine at Edinburgh.
Kaite could easily imagine the world Jex-Blake, the trailblazer who became the first female doctor in Scotland, inhabited.
Kaite's character was inspired by Sophia Jex-Blake, the first woman to study medicine at Edinburgh
In Great Britain, physicians Sophia Jex-Blake, Elizabeth Blackwell, and Elizabeth (Garrett Anderson were influential in enabling women to enter the medical profession.
The first woman physician from Scotland, Sophia Jex-Blake (1840-1912), was also a pioneer of the Suffrage movement in England and Scotand.
The well known are Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell (USA), Sophia Jex-Blake and Elizabeth Garett Anderson (Scotland, England), Aletta Jacobs (Netherlands), Theodora Rajewska (Bosnia), (62) and Draga Ljooic and Marija Vuoetic Prita (Serbia).
When the London School of Medicine for Women, (later to become the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine for Women) opened in 1874, it was mainly due to the efforts of another great pioneer for the medical education of women, Sophia Jex-Blake (1840-1912).
Sophia Jex-Blake (1840-1912), who enrolled to read medicine at Edinburgh University in 1868, had faced a long and weary legal battle against obstructionists in the university at every level, which was not finally won until 1876.
When she was 16, she enrolled at the University of Edinburgh to study medicine with Sophia Jex-Blake and her coterie.
Nine years later, Sophia Jex-Blake and several other women encountered more violent opposition in Edinburgh, where male students rioted to prevent women from attending clinical instruction.
It is perhaps her own experience as a woman doctor that made her especially sensitive to the virulent misogyny that Jex-Blake encountered as she struggled for the right of British women to become physicians.
Sophia Jex-Blake, a determined independent woman who was able to overcome even the strong barriers of Victorian medical misogyny.